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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:强木根 大小:3IfSxuRy29401KB 下载:sQzcatMV24877次
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日期:2020-08-06 10:24:56
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Mother- but you are so hard that I cannot call you by such aname- why do you keep away from my father in this way? Why do younot sit by his side and begin talking to him and asking him questions?No other woman could bear to keep away from her husband when he hadcome back to her after twenty years of absence, and after havinggone through so much; but your heart always was as hard as a stone."
2.  Then Dolius put out both his hands and went up to Ulysses. "Sir,"said he, seizing his master's hand and kissing it at the wrist, "wehave long been wishing you home: and now heaven has restored you to usafter we had given up hoping. All hail, therefore, and may the godsprosper you. But tell me, does Penelope already know of your return,or shall we send some one to tell her?"
3.  "Immediately after we had got past the island I saw a great wavefrom which spray was rising, and I heard a loud roaring sound. The menwere so frightened that they loosed hold of their oars, for thewhole sea resounded with the rushing of the waters, but the shipstayed where it was, for the men had left off rowing. I went round,therefore, and exhorted them man by man not to lose heart.
4.  "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.
5.  "At any other time," replied Telemachus, "I should have bidden yougo to my own house, for you would find no want of hospitality; atthe present moment, however, you would not be comfortable there, for Ishall be away, and my mother will not see you; she does not often showherself even to the suitors, but sits at her loom weaving in anupper chamber, out of their way; but I can tell you a man whosehouse you can go to- I mean Eurymachus the son of Polybus, who is heldin the highest estimation by every one in Ithaca. He is much thebest man and the most persistent wooer, of all those who are payingcourt to my mother and trying to take Ulysses' place. Jove, however,in heaven alone knows whether or no they will come to a bad end beforethe marriage takes place."
6.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, do not chide with me, but, godwilling, I will be chief too if I can. Is this the worst fate youcan think of for me? It is no bad thing to be a chief, for it bringsboth riches and honour. Still, now that Ulysses is dead there are manygreat men in Ithaca both old and young, and some other may take thelead among them; nevertheless I will be chief in my own house, andwill rule those whom Ulysses has won for me."

计划指导

1.  This was what he said, but all the time he was expecting to beable to string the bow and shoot through the iron, whereas in facthe was to be the first that should taste of the arrows from thehands of Ulysses, whom he was dishonouring in his own house- eggingthe others on to do so also.
2.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, how can I drive the mother whobore me from my father's house? My father is abroad and we do not knowwhether he is alive or dead. It will be hard on me if I have to payIcarius the large sum which I must give him if I insist on sending hisdaughter back to him. Not only will he deal rigorously with me, butheaven will also punish me; for my mother when she leaves the housewill calf on the Erinyes to avenge her; besides, it would not be acreditable thing to do, and I will have nothing to say to it. If youchoose to take offence at this, leave the house and feast elsewhere atone another's houses at your own cost turn and turn about. If, onthe other hand, you elect to persist in spunging upon one man,heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon with you in full, and when youfall in my father's house there shall be no man to avenge you."
3.  When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.
4.  The company then laid their hands upon the good things that werebefore them, but as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink,the muse inspired Demodocus to sing the feats of heroes, and moreespecially a matter that was then in the mouths of all men, to wit,the quarrel between Ulysses and Achilles, and the fierce words thatthey heaped on one another as they gat together at a banquet. ButAgamemnon was glad when he heard his chieftains quarrelling with oneanother, for Apollo had foretold him this at Pytho when he crossed thestone floor to consult the oracle. Here was the beginning of theevil that by the will of Jove fell both Danaans and Trojans.
5.  "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."
6.  With these words he made a drink-offering, and when he had drunkhe put the gold cup again into the hands of Amphinomus, who walkedaway serious and bowing his head, for he foreboded evil. But even sohe did not escape destruction, for Minerva had doomed him fall bythe hand of Telemachus. So he took his seat again at the place fromwhich he had come.

推荐功能

1.  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."
2.  The swineherd went back when he heard this, and Penelope said as shesaw him cross the threshold, "Why do you not bring him here,Eumaeus? Is he afraid that some one will ill-treat him, or is he shyof coming inside the house at all? Beggars should not be shamefaced."
3.  Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."
4.  "But the men disobeyed my orders, took to their own devices, andravaged the land of the Egyptians, killing the men, and taking theirwives and children captive. The alarm was soon carried to the city,and when they heard the war cry, the people came out at daybreaktill the plain was filled with horsemen and foot soldiers and with thegleam of armour. Then Jove spread panic among my men, and they wouldno longer face the enemy, for they found themselves surrounded. TheEgyptians killed many of us, and took the rest alive to do forcedlabour for them. Jove, however, put it in my mind to do thus- and Iwish I had died then and there in Egypt instead, for there was muchsorrow in store for me- I took off my helmet and shield and dropped myspear from my hand; then I went straight up to the king's chariot,clasped his knees and kissed them, whereon he spared my life, bademe get into his chariot, and took me weeping to his own home. Manymade at me with their ashen spears and tried to kil me in theirfury, but the king protected me, for he feared the wrath of Jove theprotector of strangers, who punishes those who do evil.
5.   On this she came down from her upper room, and while doing so sheconsidered whether she should keep at a distance from her husbandand question him, or whether she should at once go up to him andembrace him. When, however, she had crossed the stone floor of thecloister, she sat down opposite Ulysses by the fire, against thewall at right angles [to that by which she had entered], while Ulyssessat near one of the bearing-posts, looking upon the ground, andwaiting to see what his wife would say to him when she saw him. Fora long time she sat silent and as one lost in amazement. At one momentshe looked him full in the face, but then again directly, she wasmisled by his shabby clothes and failed to recognize him, tillTelemachus began to reproach her and said:
6.  On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."

应用

1.  "Run and fetch them," answered Ulysses, "while my arrows hold out,or when I am alone they may get me away from the door."
2.  Then Penelope resolved that she would show herself to the suitors.She knew of the plot against Telemachus, for the servant Medon hadoverheard their counsels and had told her; she went down thereforeto the court attended by her maidens, and when she reached the suitorsshe stood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of thecloister holding a veil before her face, and rebuked Antinous saying:
3.  Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, theyate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down torest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
4、  On this they hurried off on their several errands. The heifer wasbrought in from the plain, and Telemachus's crew came from the ship;the goldsmith brought the anvil, hammer, and tongs, with which heworked his gold, and Minerva herself came to the sacrifice. Nestorgave out the gold, and the smith gilded the horns of the heifer thatthe goddess might have pleasure in their beauty. Then Stratius andEchephron brought her in by the horns; Aretus fetched water from thehouse in a ewer that had a flower pattern on it, and in his other handhe held a basket of barley meal; sturdy Thrasymedes stood by with asharp axe, ready to strike the heifer, while Perseus held a bucket.Then Nestor began with washing his hands and sprinkling the barleymeal, and he offered many a prayer to Minerva as he threw a lockfrom the heifer's head upon the fire.
5、  And Telemachus answered, "I will tell you truly everything. There isno emnity between me and my people, nor can I complain of brothers, towhom a man may look for support however great his quarrel may be. Jovehas made us a race of only sons. Laertes was the only son ofArceisius, and Ulysses only son of Laertes. I am myself the only sonof Ulysses who left me behind him when he went away, so that I havenever been of any use to him. Hence it comes that my house is in thehands of numberless marauders; for the chiefs from all theneighbouring islands, Dulichium, Same, Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying court to my mother, who will neither say point blankthat she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end, so theyare making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so withmyself into the bargain. The issue, however, rests with heaven. But doyou, old friend Eumaeus, go at once and tell Penelope that I am safeand have returned from Pylos. Tell it to herself alone, and thencome back here without letting any one else know, for there are manywho are plotting mischief against me."

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网友评论(MxzREAwD56115))

  • 崔岱耿 08-05

      "Telemachus," said she, "the men are on board and at their oars,waiting for you to give your orders, so make haste and let us be off."

  • 郑汉星 08-05

      "We do not know, Piraeus," answered Telemachus, "what may happen. Ifthe suitors kill me in my own house and divide my property among them,I would rather you had the presents than that any of those peopleshould get hold of them. If on the other hand I manage to kill them, Ishall be much obliged if you will kindly bring me my presents."

  • 雷伍万 08-05

       She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then going upstairs with her handmaids into her room, shemourned her dear husband till Minerva sent sweet sleep over hereyelids.

  • 张皓 08-05

      The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.

  • 陈华文 08-04

    {  When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."

  • 严定宪 08-03

      When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Ulysses puton his shirt and cloak, while the goddess wore a dress of a lightgossamer fabric, very fine and graceful, with a beautiful goldengirdle about her waist and a veil to cover her head. She at once setherself to think how she could speed Ulysses on his way. So she gavehim a great bronze axe that suited his hands; it was sharpened on bothsides, and had a beautiful olive-wood handle fitted firmly on to it.She also gave him a sharp adze, and then led the way to the far end ofthe island where the largest trees grew- alder, poplar and pine,that reached the sky- very dry and well seasoned, so as to saillight for him in the water. Then, when she had shown him where thebest trees grew, Calypso went home, leaving him to cut them, whichhe soon finished doing. He cut down twenty trees in all and adzed themsmooth, squaring them by rule in good workmanlike fashion. MeanwhileCalypso came back with some augers, so he bored holes with them andfitted the timbers together with bolts and rivets. He made the raft asbroad as a skilled shipwright makes the beam of a large vessel, and hefiled a deck on top of the ribs, and ran a gunwale all round it. Healso made a mast with a yard arm, and a rudder to steer with. Hefenced the raft all round with wicker hurdles as a protectionagainst the waves, and then he threw on a quantity of wood. By andby Calypso brought him some linen to make the sails, and he made thesetoo, excellently, making them fast with braces and sheets. Last ofall, with the help of levers, he drew the raft down into the water.}

  • 王锋 08-03

      As he spoke he reeled, and fell sprawling face upwards on theground. His great neck hung heavily backwards and a deep sleep tookhold upon him. Presently he turned sick, and threw up both wine andthe gobbets of human flesh on which he had been gorging, for he wasvery drunk. Then I thrust the beam of wood far into the embers to heatit, and encouraged my men lest any of them should turnfaint-hearted. When the wood, green though it was, was about to blaze,I drew it out of the fire glowing with heat, and my men gathered roundme, for heaven had filled their hearts with courage. We drove thesharp end of the beam into the monster's eye, and bearing upon it withall my weight I kept turning it round and round as though I wereboring a hole in a ship's plank with an auger, which two men with awheel and strap can keep on turning as long as they choose. Eventhus did we bore the red hot beam into his eye, till the boiling bloodbubbled all over it as we worked it round and round, so that the steamfrom the burning eyeball scalded his eyelids and eyebrows, and theroots of the eye sputtered in the fire. As a blacksmith plunges an axeor hatchet into cold water to temper it- for it is this that givesstrength to the iron- and it makes a great hiss as he does so, eventhus did the Cyclops' eye hiss round the beam of olive wood, and hishideous yells made the cave ring again. We ran away in a fright, buthe plucked the beam all besmirched with gore from his eye, andhurled it from him in a frenzy of rage and pain, shouting as he did soto the other Cyclopes who lived on the bleak headlands near him; sothey gathered from all quarters round his cave when they heard himcrying, and asked what was the matter with him.

  • 李佳向 08-03

      "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."

  • 公孙瓒 08-02

       He wept as he spoke and every one pitied him. But Medon and the bardPhemius had now woke up, and came to them from the house of Ulysses.Every one was astonished at seeing them, but they stood in themiddle of the assembly, and Medon said, "Hear me, men of Ithaca.Ulysses did not do these things against the will of heaven. I myselfsaw an immortal god take the form of Mentor and stand beside him. Thisgod appeared, now in front of him encouraging him, and now goingfuriously about the court and attacking the suitors whereon theyfell thick on one another."

  • 刘琦 07-31

    {  "And I saw Tityus son of Gaia stretched upon the plain andcovering some nine acres of ground. Two vultures on either side of himwere digging their beaks into his liver, and he kept on trying to beatthem off with his hands, but could not; for he had violated Jove'smistress Leto as she was going through Panopeus on her way to Pytho.

  • 科尔巴克 07-31

      "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.

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