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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:殷广森 大小:ALUeg37441453KB 下载:IcBPg22539512次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:XikSx6199882条
日期:2020-08-12 21:24:17
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李志伟

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  It was not long ere Penelope came to know what the suitors wereplotting; for a man servant, Medon, overheard them from outside theouter court as they were laying their schemes within, and went to tellhis mistress. As he crossed the threshold of her room Penelope said:"Medon, what have the suitors sent you here for? Is it to tell themaids to leave their master's business and cook dinner for them? Iwish they may neither woo nor dine henceforward, neither here noranywhere else, but let this be the very last time, for the waste youall make of my son's estate. Did not your fathers tell you when youwere children how good Ulysses had been to them- never doinganything high-handed, nor speaking harshly to anybody? Kings may saythings sometimes, and they may take a fancy to one man and dislikeanother, but Ulysses never did an unjust thing by anybody- which showswhat bad hearts you have, and that there is no such thing as gratitudeleft in this world."
2.  "Then I tried to find some way of embracing my mother's ghost.Thrice I sprang towards her and tried to clasp her in my arms, buteach time she flitted from my embrace as it were a dream or phantom,and being touched to the quick I said to her, 'Mother, why do younot stay still when I would embrace you? If we could throw our armsaround one another we might find sad comfort in the sharing of oursorrows even in the house of Hades; does Proserpine want to lay astill further load of grief upon me by mocking me with a phantomonly?'
3.  Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."
4.  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.
5.  On this he broke up the assembly, and every man went back to his ownabode, while the suitors returned to the house of Ulysses.
6.  "And now, tell me and tell me true. Where have you been wandering,and in what countries have you travelled? Tell us of the peoplesthemselves, and of their cities- who were hostile, savage anduncivilized, and who, on the other hand, hospitable and humane. Tellus also why you are made unhappy on hearing about the return of theArgive Danaans from Troy. The gods arranged all this, and sent themtheir misfortunes in order that future generations might havesomething to sing about. Did you lose some brave kinsman of yourwife's when you were before Troy? a son-in-law or father-in-law- whichare the nearest relations a man has outside his own flesh and blood?or was it some brave and kindly-natured comrade- for a good friendis as dear to a man as his own brother?"

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1.  BUT as the sun was rising from the fair sea into the firmament ofheaven to shed Blight on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos thecity of Neleus. Now the people of Pylos were gathered on the sea shoreto offer sacrifice of black bulls to Neptune lord of the Earthquake.There were nine guilds with five hundred men in each, and there werenine bulls to each guild. As they were eating the inward meats andburning the thigh bones [on the embers] in the name of Neptune,Telemachus and his crew arrived, furled their sails, brought theirship to anchor, and went ashore.
2.  "At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, forshe was of a good natural disposition; moreover there was a bardwith her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out forTroy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven hadcounselled her destruction, Aegisthus thus this bard off to a desertisland and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon- afterwhich she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus. Then heoffered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated manytemples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyondhis expectations.
3.  Then Minerva answered, "Sir, you have spoken well, and it will bemuch better that Telemachus should do as you have said; he, therefore,shall return with you and sleep at your house, but I must go back togive orders to my crew, and keep them in good heart. I am the onlyolder person among them; the rest are all young men of Telemachus' ownage, who have taken this voyage out of friendship; so I must return tothe ship and sleep there. Moreover to-morrow I must go to theCauconians where I have a large sum of money long owing to me. Asfor Telemachus, now that he is your guest, send him to Lacedaemon in achariot, and let one of your sons go with him. Be pleased also toprovide him with your best and fleetest horses."
4.  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.
5.  "You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vainhopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could ofhimself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself oldand young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him. A secondago you were old and all in rags, and now you are like some god comedown from heaven."
6.  In like words Eumaeus prayed to all the gods that Ulysses mightreturn; when, therefore, he saw for certain what mind they were of,Ulysses said, "It is I, Ulysses, who am here. I have suffered much,but at last, in the twentieth year, I am come back to my owncountry. I find that you two alone of all my servants are glad thatI should do so, for I have not heard any of the others praying formy return. To you two, therefore, will I unfold the truth as itshall be. If heaven shall deliver the suitors into my hands, I willfind wives for both of you, will give you house and holding close tomy own, and you shall be to me as though you were brothers and friendsof Telemachus. I will now give you convincing proofs that you may knowme and be assured. See, here is the scar from the boar's tooth thatripped me when I was out hunting on Mount Parnassus with the sons ofAutolycus."

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1.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
2.  Thus did they converse, but King Apollo said to Mercury,"Messenger Mercury, giver of good things, you would not care howstrong the chains were, would you, if you could sleep with Venus?"
3.  Then Eurymachus, son of Polybus, answered, "It rests with heavento decide who shall be chief among us, but you shall be master in yourown house and over your own possessions; no one while there is a manin Ithaca shall do you violence nor rob you. And now, my goodfellow, I want to know about this stranger. What country does hecome from? Of what family is he, and where is his estate? Has hebrought you news about the return of your father, or was he onbusiness of his own? He seemed a well-to-do man, but he hurried off sosuddenly that he was gone in a moment before we could get to knowhim."
4.  Thus did Ulysses sleep, and the young men slept beside him. Butthe swineherd did not like sleeping away from his pigs, so he gotready to go and Ulysses was glad to see that he looked after hisproperty during his master's absence. First he slung his sword overhis brawny shoulders and put on a thick cloak to keep out the wind. Healso took the skin of a large and well fed goat, and a javelin in caseof attack from men or dogs. Thus equipped he went to his rest wherethe pigs were camping under an overhanging rock that gave them shelterfrom the North wind.
5.   Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, theyate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down torest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
6.  As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.

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1.  Thus did they converse, and presently the swineherds came up withthe pigs, which were then shut up for the night in their sties, anda tremendous squealing they made as they were being driven intothem. But Eumaeus called to his men and said, "Bring in the best pigyou have, that I may sacrifice for this stranger, and we will taketoll of him ourselves. We have had trouble enough this long timefeeding pigs, while others reap the fruit of our labour."
2.  "I was broken hearted when I heard that I must go back all that longand terrible voyage to Egypt; nevertheless, I answered, 'I will doall, old man, that you have laid upon me; but now tell me, and tell metrue, whether all the Achaeans whom Nestor and I left behind us whenwe set sail from Troy have got home safely, or whether any one of themcame to a bad end either on board his own ship or among his friendswhen the days of his fighting were done.'
3.  "And I saw Leda the wife of Tyndarus, who bore him two famoussons, Castor breaker of horses, and Pollux the mighty boxer. Boththese heroes are lying under the earth, though they are still alive,for by a special dispensation of Jove, they die and come to lifeagain, each one of them every other day throughout all time, andthey have the rank of gods.
4、  "'Of these two rocks the one reaches heaven and its peak is lostin a dark cloud. This never leaves it, so that the top is neverclear not even in summer and early autumn. No man though he had twentyhands and twenty feet could get a foothold on it and climb it, forit runs sheer up, as smooth as though it had been polished. In themiddle of it there is a large cavern, looking West and turnedtowards Erebus; you must take your ship this way, but the cave is sohigh up that not even the stoutest archer could send an arrow into it.Inside it Scylla sits and yelps with a voice that you might take to bethat of a young hound, but in truth she is a dreadful monster and noone- not even a god- could face her without being terror-struck. Shehas twelve mis-shapen feet, and six necks of the most prodigiouslength; and at the end of each neck she has a frightful head withthree rows of teeth in each, all set very close together, so that theywould crunch any one to death in a moment, and she sits deep withinher shady cell thrusting out her heads and peering all round the rock,fishing for dolphins or dogfish or any larger monster that she cancatch, of the thousands with which Amphitrite teems. No ship everyet got past her without losing some men, for she shoots out all herheads at once, and carries off a man in each mouth.
5、  "When I had said this she went straight through the court with herwand in her hand and opened the pigsty doors. My men came out likeso many prime hogs and stood looking at her, but she went aboutamong them and anointed each with a second drug, whereon thebristles that the bad drug had given them fell off, and they becamemen again, younger than they were before, and much taller and betterlooking. They knew me at once, seized me each of them by the hand, andwept for joy till the whole house was filled with the sound of theirhullabalooing, and Circe herself was so sorry for them that she cameup to me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, go back at onceto the sea where you have left your ship, and first draw it on tothe land. Then, hide all your ship's gear and property in some cave,and come back here with your men.'

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  • 孙雨 08-07

      "Stockman," answered Ulysses, "you seem to be a very well-disposedperson, and I can see that you are a man of sense. Therefore I willtell you, and will confirm my words with an oath: by Jove, the chiefof all gods, and by that hearth of Ulysses to which I am now come,Ulysses shall return before you leave this place, and if you are sominded you shall see him killing the suitors who are now mastershere."

  • 蒿坪 08-07

      Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:

  • 温瑞安 08-07

       THEN Ulysses tore off his rags, and sprang on to the broadpavement with his bow and his quiver full of arrows. He shed thearrows on to the ground at his feet and said, "The mighty contest isat an end. I will now see whether Apollo will vouchsafe it to me tohit another mark which no man has yet hit."

  • 坦米尔 08-07

      "When we had passed the [Wandering] rocks, with Scylla andterrible Charybdis, we reached the noble island of the sun-god,where were the goodly cattle and sheep belonging to the sunHyperion. While still at sea in my ship I could bear the cattle lowingas they came home to the yards, and the sheep bleating. Then Iremembered what the blind Theban prophet Teiresias had told me, andhow carefully Aeaean Circe had warned me to shun the island of theblessed sun-god. So being much troubled I said to the men, 'My men,I know you are hard pressed, but listen while I tell you theprophecy that Teiresias made me, and how carefully Aeaean Circe warnedme to shun the island of the blessed sun-god, for it was here, shesaid, that our worst danger would lie. Head the ship, therefore,away from the island.'

  • 孔西利 08-06

    {  On either side there stood gold and silver mastiffs which Vulcan,with his consummate skill, had fashioned expressly to keep watchover the palace of king Alcinous; so they were immortal and couldnever grow old. Seats were ranged all along the wall, here and therefrom one end to the other, with coverings of fine woven work which thewomen of the house had made. Here the chief persons of the Phaeciansused to sit and eat and drink, for there was abundance at all seasons;and there were golden figures of young men with lighted torches intheir hands, raised on pedestals, to give light by night to thosewho were at table. There are fifty maid servants in the house, some ofwhom are always grinding rich yellow grain at the mill, while otherswork at the loom, or sit and spin, and their shuttles go, backwardsand forwards like the fluttering of aspen leaves, while the linen isso closely woven that it will turn oil. As the Phaecians are thebest sailors in the world, so their women excel all others in weaving,for Minerva has taught them all manner of useful arts, and they arevery intelligent.

  • 林建勋 08-05

      Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.}

  • 贝加佐 08-05

      Then Telemachus spoke. "Great heavens!" he exclaimed, "Jove musthave robbed me of my senses. Here is my dear and excellent mothersaying she will quit this house and marry again, yet I am laughing andenjoying myself as though there were nothing happening. But,suitors, as the contest has been agreed upon, let it go forward. It isfor a woman whose peer is not to be found in Pylos, Argos, orMycene, nor yet in Ithaca nor on the mainland. You know this as wellas I do; what need have I to speak in praise of my mother? Come on,then, make no excuses for delay, but let us see whether you can stringthe bow or no. I too will make trial of it, for if I can string it andshoot through the iron, I shall not suffer my mother to quit thishouse with a stranger, not if I can win the prizes which my father wonbefore me."

  • 文国强 08-05

      Then the vision said, "Take heart, and be not so much dismayed.There is one gone with him whom many a man would be glad enough tohave stand by his side, I mean Minerva; it is she who has compassionupon you, and who has sent me to bear you this message."

  • 杜朋举 08-04

       They all held their peace until Amphinomus rose to speak. He was theson of Nisus, who was son to king Aretias, and he was foremost amongall the suitors from the wheat-growing and well grassed island ofDulichium; his conversation, moreover, was more agreeable toPenelope than that of any of the other for he was a man of goodnatural disposition. "My friends," said he, speaking to them plainlyand in all honestly, "I am not in favour of killing Telemachus. Itis a heinous thing to kill one who is of noble blood. Let us firsttake counsel of the gods, and if the oracles of Jove advise it, I willboth help to kill him myself, and will urge everyone else to do so;but if they dissuade us, I would have you hold your hands."

  • 徐平东 08-02

    {  "My dears, heaven has been pleased to try me with more afflictionthan any other woman of my age and country. First I lost my braveand lion-hearted husband, who had every good quality under heaven, andwhose name was great over all Hellas and middle Argos, and now mydarling son is at the mercy of the winds and waves, without myhaving heard one word about his leaving home. You hussies, there wasnot one of you would so much as think of giving me a call out of mybed, though you all of you very well knew when he was starting. If Ihad known he meant taking this voyage, he would have had to give itup, no matter how much he was bent upon it, or leave me a corpsebehind him- one or other. Now, however, go some of you and call oldDolius, who was given me by my father on my marriage, and who is mygardener. Bid him go at once and tell everything to Laertes, who maybe able to hit on some plan for enlisting public sympathy on our side,as against those who are trying to exterminate his own race and thatof Ulysses."

  • 游光甫 08-02

      On this pale fear seized every one; they were so frightened thattheir arms dropped from their hands and fell upon the ground at thesound of the goddess's voice, and they fled back to the city for theirlives. But Ulysses gave a great cry, and gathering himself togetherswooped down like a soaring eagle. Then the son of Saturn sent athunderbolt of fire that fell just in front of Minerva, so she said toUlysses, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, stop this warful strife, orJove will be angry with you."

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