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2020-08-07 13:05:35  Դձ
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2bugַ:a g 9 559 v i p<'Then I should love Mrs. Reed, which I cannot do; I should blessher son John, which is impossible.'I did so, not at first aware what was his intention; but when I sawhim lift and poise the book and stand in act to hurl it, Iinstinctively started aside with a cry of alarm: not soon enough,however; the volume was flung, it hit me, and I fell, striking my headagainst the door and cutting it. The cut bled, the pain was sharp:my terror had passed its climax; other feelings succeeded.

'Why, I shall soon be away from you, and besides'- I was going tosay something about what had passed between me and Mrs. Reed, but onsecond thoughts I considered it better to remain silent on that head.

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'Be sure and take good care of her,' cried she to the guard, ashe lifted me into the inside.

Mr. Brocklehurst nodded.

'Are you going somewhere, Helen? Are you going home?'

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'Don't trouble yourself to give her a character,' returned Mr.Rochester: 'eulogiums will not bias me; I shall judge for myself.She began by felling my horse.'

But at that moment the summons sounded for dinner; all re-enteredthe house. The odour which now filled the refectory was scarcelymore appetising than that which had regaled our nostrils at breakfast:the dinner was served in two huge tin-plated vessels, whence rose astrong steam redolent of rancid fat. I found the mess to consist ofindifferent potatoes and strange shreds of rusty meat, mixed andcooked together. Of this preparation a tolerably abundant plateful wasapportioned to each pupil. I ate what I could, and wondered withinmyself whether every day's fare would be like this.

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A singular notion dawned upon me. I doubted not- never doubted-that if Mr. Reed had been alive he would have treated me kindly; andnow, as I sat looking at the white bed and overshadowed walls-occasionally also turning a fascinated eye towards the dimlygleaming mirror- I began to recall what I had heard of dead men,troubled in their graves by the violation of their last wishes,revisiting the earth to punish the perjured and avenge theoppressed; and I thought Mr. Reed's spirit, harassed by the wrongsof his sister's child, might quit its abode- whether in the churchvault or in the unknown world of the departed- and rise before me inthis chamber. I wiped my tears and hushed my sobs, fearful lest anysign of violent grief might waken a preternatural voice to comfort me,or elicit from the gloom some haloed face, bending over me withstrange pity. This idea, consolatory in theory, I felt would beterrible if realised: with all my might I endeavoured to stifle it-I endeavoured to be firm. Shaking my hair from my eyes, I lifted myhead and tried to look boldly round the dark room; at this moment alight gleamed on the wall. Was it, I asked myself, a ray from the moonpenetrating some aperture in the blind? No; moonlight was still, andthis stirred; while I gazed, it glided up to the ceiling andquivered over my head. I can now conjecture readily that this streakof light was, in all likelihood, a gleam from a lantern carried bysome one across the lawn: but then, prepared as my mind was forhorror, shaken as my nerves were by agitation, I thought the swiftdarting beam was a herald of some coming vision from another world. Myheart beat thick, my head grew hot; a sound filled my ears, which Ideemed the rushing of wings; something seemed near me; I wasoppressed, suffocated: endurance broke down; I rushed to the doorand shook the lock in desperate effort. Steps came running along theouter passage; the key turned, Bessie and Abbot entered.

They conversed of things I had never heard of; of nations and timespast; of countries far away; of secrets of nature discovered orguessed at: they spoke of books: how many they had read! What storesof knowledge they possessed! Then they seemed so familiar withFrench names and French authors: but my amazement reached its climaxwhen Miss Temple asked Helen if she sometimes snatched a moment torecall the Latin her father had taught her, and taking a book from ashelf, bade her read and construe a page of Virgil; and Helenobeyed, my organ of veneration expanding at every sounding line. Shehad scarcely finished ere the bell announced bedtime! no delay couldbe admitted; Miss Temple embraced us both, saying, as she drew us toher heart-

'To Miss Temple? Oh, no! I wish it did: she has to answer to Mr.Brocklehurst for all she does. Mr. Brocklehurst buys all our foodand all our clothes.'

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'How do you like Thornfield?' she asked. I told her I liked it verymuch.

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2bugɽ ˫߶Ի A great tumult succeeded for some minutes, during which Miss Millerrepeatedly exclaimed, 'Silence!' and 'Order!' When it subsided, Isaw them all drawn up in four semicircles, before four chairs,placed at the four tables; all held books in their hands, and agreat book, like a Bible, lay on each table, before the vacant seat. Apause of some seconds succeeded, filled up by the low, vague hum ofnumbers; Miss Miller walked from class to class, hushing thisindefinite sound. ϸ

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2bugɽٽ4.5%ӡը 'She is in the window-seat, to be sure, Jack.' ϸ

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