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2020-08-05 19:51:19  Դձ
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This Sonne of mine Jeronimo, being as yet but foureteene years ofage, is so deeply enamoured of a yong Girle, named Silvestra, daughterunto a poore Tailor, our neere dwelling neighbour: that if we do notsend him out of her company, one day (perhaps) he may make her hiswife, and yet without any knowledge of ours, which questionlesse wouldbe my death. Otherwise, he may pine and consume himselfe away, if hesee us procure her marriage to some other. Wherefore, hold it good,that to avoid so great an inconvenience, we should send Jeronimosome far distance hence, to remaine where some of our Factors areemployed: because, when he shall be out of her sight, and theiroften meetings utterly disappointed; his affection to her will thesooner cease, by frustrating his hope for ever enjoying her, and so weshall have the better meanes, to match him with one of greaterquality. The Tutors did like well of her advice, not doubting but itwould take answerable effect: and therefore, calling Jeronimo into aprivate Parlor, one of them began in this manner.

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THE FIRST DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL

Moreover, thus he conceived, that if it were he, he could not butremember his owne name, his Fathers, and the Armenian Language;wherefore, when he was just opposite before the window, hee calledaloud to him, saying: Theodoro. Pedro hearing the voyce, presentlylifted up his head, and Phinio speaking Armenian, saide: Of whence artthou, and what is thy Fathers name? The Sergeants (in reverence to theLord Ambassador) stayed awhile, till Pedro had returned his answer,who saide. I am an Armenian borne, Sonne to one Phineo, and wasbrought hither I cannot tell by whom. Phineo hearing this, knew thenassuredly, that this was the same Sonne which he had lost;wherefore, the teares standing in his eyes with conceite of joy, downehe descended from the window, and the other Ambassadors with him,running in among the Sergeants to embrace his Sonne, and casting hisowne rich Cloake about his whipt body, entreating them to forbeare andproceed no further, till they heard what command he should returnewithall unto them; which very willingly they promised to do.

HEE HIM-SELFE DO RASHLY RUN INTO ALL THE SHAME AND REPROACH

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Moreover, she was so grievously payned with the head-ake, as itseemed to split in a thousand pieces, whereat there needed no greatthe Lead of the Turret being so exceedingly hot, that it affoorded notthe least defence against it, or any repose to qualifie the torment:but drove her still from one place to another, in hope of ease, butnone was there to be found.

WHEREIN IS DECLARED THE POWER OF LOVE, AND THEIR CRUILTY JUSTLY

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Panuccio having subtily observed all this, and in what manner theywent to bed; after such a space of time, as he imagined them to be allfast asleepe, he arose very softly, and stealing to the bed ofNicholetta, lay downe gently by her. And albeit she seemed somewhatafraid at the first, yet wheri she perceived who it was, shee ratherbad him welcome, then shewed her selfe any way discontented. Now whilePanuccio continued thus with the maide, it fortuned that a Cat threwdown somewhat in the house, the noise wherof awaked the wife, andfearing greater harme, then (indeed) had hapned, she arose without aCandle, and went groping in the darke, towards the place where sheeheard the noyse. Adriano, who had no other meaning but well, foundoccasion also to rise, about some naturall necessity, and making hispassage in the darke, stumbled on the childes Cradle (in the way)where the woman had set it, and being unable to passe by, withoutremoving it from the place: tooke and set it by his owne beds side,and having done the businesse for which he rose, returned to his bedagaine, never remembring to set the Cradle where first he found it.

Albert being come to the house, knocked at the doore, and the Maideadmitting him entrance, according as her Mistresse had appointed,she conducted him to her Mistresses Chamber, where laying aside hisFriars habite, and she seeing him shine with such glorioussplendour, adding action also to his assumed dissimulation, withmajesticke motion of his body, wings, and bow, as if he had bene GodCupid indeede, converted into a body much bigger of stature, thenPainters commonly do describe him, her wisedome was overcome withfeare and admiration, that she fell on her knees before him,expressing all humble reverence unto him. And he spreading his wingsover her, as with wiers and strings he had made them pliant; shewedhow graciously he accepted her humiliation; folding her in hisarmes, and sweetly kissing her many times together, with repetition ofhis entire love and affection towards her. So delicately was heperfumed with odorifferous savours, and so compleate of person inhis spangled garments, that she could do nothing else, but wonder athis rare behaviour, reputing her felicity beyond all Womens in theworld, and utterly impossible to be equalled, such was the pride ofher presuming. For he told her clivers tales and fables, of hisawefull power among the other Gods, and stolne pleasures of his uponthe earth; yet gracing her praises above all his other Loves, andvowes made now, to affect none but her onely, as his often visitationsshould more constantly assure her, that she verily credited all hisprotestations, and thought his kisses and embraces, farre to exceedany mortall comparison.

After these, and many more like loving speeches had passed betweenthem; according as Nathan very instantly requested, Mithridanesreturned back with him to the Pallace, where many dayes he highlyhonored and respected him, comforting and counselling him, to perseveralwayes in his honourable determination. But in the end, whenMithridanes could abide there no longer, because necessary occasionscalled him home: he departed thence with his men, having found by goodexperience, that hee could never goe beyond Nathan in liberality.

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THE SONG

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