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2020-08-11 12:03:28  Դձ
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Jacomino had a Maide-servant belonging to his House, somewhataged, and a Manservant beside, named Grinello, of mirthfulldisposition, and very friendly, with whom Giovanni grew in greatfamiliarity, and when he found time fit for the purpose, he discoveredhis love to him, requesting his furtherance and assistance, incompassing the height of his desire, with bountifull promises ofrich rewarding; wheret Grinello returned this answere. I know nothow to sted you in this case, but when my Master shall sup foorth atsome Neighbours house, to admit your entrance where shee is:because, if I offer to speake to her, she never will stay to hearemee. Wherefore, if my service this way may doe you any good, I promiseto performe it; doe you beside, as you shall finde it mostconvenient for you. So the bargaine was agreed on betweene them, andnothing else now remained, but to what issue it should sort in theend. Menghino, on the other side, having entred into theChamber-maides acquaintance, sped so well with her, that she deliveredso many messages from him, as had (already) halfe won the liking ofthe Virgin; passing further promises to him beside, of bringing him tohave conference with her, whensoever her Master should be absentfrom home. Thus Menghino being favoured (on the one side) by the byChamber-maide, and Giovanni (on the other) by trusty Grinello; theiramorous warre was now on foote, and diligently followed by boththeir sollicitors. Within a short while after, by the procurement ofGrinello, Jacomino was invited by a Neighbour to supper, in company ofdivers his familiar friends, whereof intelligence being given toGiovanni; a conclusion passed betweene them, that (upon a certainesignale given) he should come, and finde the doore standing readyopen, to give him all accesse unto the affected Mayden.

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Two Citizens of Siena, the one named Tingoccio Mini, and the otherMeucio di Tura, affected both one woman, called Monna Mita, to whomthe one of them was a Gossip. The Gossip dyed, and appearedafterward to his companion, according as he had formerly promisedhim to doe, and tolde him what strange wonders he had seene in theother world.

There is the great Lady of Barbanicchia; the Queene of Baschia;the Wife to the great Soldane, the Empresse of Osbeccho; theCiancianfera of Norniera; the Semistante of Berlinzona; and theScalpedra of Narsia. But why do I breake my braine, in numbering up somany to you? All the Queenes of the world are there, even so farreas to the Schinchimurra of Prester John, that hath a horne in themidst of her posteriores, albeit not visible to every eye.

One day Giosefo said to his Wife: Woman, this Gentleman is myintimate friend, and hath borne me company in all my travell: suchdyet therfore as thou wilt welcome him withall, I would have itordered (in dressing) according to his direction. Melisso perceivingthat Giosefo would needs have it to be so; in few words directed hersuch a course, as (for ever) might be to her Husbands contentment. Butshe, not altring a jote from her former disposition, but ratherfarre more froward and tempestuous: delighted to vexe and crossehim, doing every thing quite contrary to the order appointed. WhichGiosefo observing, angerly he said unto her. Was it not tolde you bymy friend, in what manner he would have our Supper drest? Sheturning fiercely to him, replyed. Am I to be directed by him orthee? Supper must and shall bee drest as I will have it: if itpleaseth mee, I care not who doth dislike it; if thou wouldst haveit otherwise, goe seeke both your Suppers where you may have it.

ٷվ-ҳ ɻ

Saladine, the great Soldan of Babylon, in the habite of aMerchant, was honourably received and welcommed, into the house ofSignior Thorello d'Istria. Who travelling to the Holy Land, prefixed acertaine time to his Wife, for his returne back to her againe,wherein, if he failed, it was lawfull for her to take another Husband.By clouding himselfe in the disguise of a Faulkner, the Soldan tookenotice of him, and did him many great honours. Afterward, Thorellofalling sicke, by Magicall Art, he was conveighed in one night toPavia, when his Wife was to be married on the morrow: where makinghimselfe knowne to her, all was disappointed, and shee went homewith him to his owne house.

THE EIGHT DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL

ٷվ-ҳйҶ ۻ

After many monthes were over-passed, at the very same place whereshe tooke landing; by chance, there arrived another small vessell ofcertaine Pisans, which remained there divers daies. In this Barkewas a Gentleman, named Conrado de Marchesi Malespini, with his holyand vertuous wife, who were returned backe from a Pilgrimage, havingvisited all the sanctified places that then were in the kingdome ofApulia, and now were bound homeward to their owne abiding. ThisGentleman, for the expelling of melancholly perturbations, oneespeciall day amongst other, with his wife, servants, and waintinghounds, wandred up into the Iland not far from the place of MadamBeritolaes desert dwelling. The hounds questing after game, at lasthappened on the two Kids where they were feeding, and (by this time)had attained to indifferent growth; and finding themselves thuspursued by the hounds, fled to no other part of the wood, then tothe cave where Beritola remained, and seeming as if they sought tobe rescued only by her, she sodainly caught up a staffe, and forcedthe hounds thence to flight.

Milde and modest Ladies, for ought I can perceive to the contrary,this day was dedicated to none but Kings, Soldanes, and greatPotentates, not in favour of any inferiour or meaner persons. Andtherefore, because I would be loth to dis-ranke my selfe from therest, I purpose to speake of a Lord Marquesse, not any matter of greatmagnificence, but rather in a more humble nature, and sorted to anhonest end: which yet I will not advise any to immitate, because(perhaps) they cannot so well digest it, as they did whom my Novellconcerneth; thus then I begin.

LIBERALITY, OR IN MAGNIFICENT MANNER, PERFORMED ANY WORTHY

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Her Brethren in scornefull manner reprooved her, telling her, thathe was a begger, and had nothing left to keepe him in the world. Iknow it well (quoth she) and am heartily sorry for it. But give me aman that hath neede of wealth, rather then wealth that hath neede of aman. The Brethren hearing how she stood addicted, and knowingFrederigo to be a worthy Gentleman, though poverty had disgraced himin the World: consented thereto, so she bestowed her selfe and herriches on him. He on the other side, having so noble a Lady to hisWife, and the same whom he had so long and deerely loved, submittedall his fairest Fortunes unto her, became a better husband (for theworld) then before, and they lived, and loved together in equall joyand happinesse.

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ٷվ-ҳƼĶ

ٷվ-ҳҮ2020ҵ˾ָͯ Madam, the further charge imposed on me by God Cupid, was to tellyou, that himselfe is so extremely enamored of your beauty, and youare become so gracious in his affection; as, many nights he hathcome to see you in your Chamber, sitting on your pillow, while youslept sweetly, and desiring very often to awake you, but onely fearingto affright you. Wherefore, now he sends you word by me, that onenight he intendeth to come visite you, and to spend some time inconversing with you. But in regard he is a God, and meerely a spiritin forme, whereby neither you or any else have capacity of beholdinghim, much lesse to touch or feele him: he saith that (for your sake)he will come in the shape of a man, giving me charge also to know ofyou, when you shall please to have him come, and in whose similitudeyou would have him to come, whereof he will not falle; in whichrespect, you may justly thinke your selfe to be the onely happywoman livng, and farre beyond all other in your good fortune. ϸ

˯ֲ| ̵2018|ǴţڹֿġꡱƤͧ

ٷվ-ҳ簲ٴμӴ At his departing from him, hee went directly to the Signoria, andprevailed so far that he spake privately with a Knight, who was thenone of the States chiefest Lords, to whom he saide. Sir, a man oughtto bestow his best paines and diligence, that the truth of thingsshould be apparantly knowne, especially, such men as hold the placeand office as you doe: to the end, that those persons which havecommitted no foule offence, should not bee punished, but onely theguilty and haynous transgressors. And because it will be no meanehonor to you, to lay the blame where it worthily deserveth, I amcome hither purposely, to informe you in a case of most weightyimportance. It is not unknowne to you, with what rigour the State hathproceeded against Aldobrandino Palermini, and you think verily he isthe man that hath slaine Theobaldo Elisei, whereupon your Law hathcondemned him to die. I dare assure you Sir, that a very unjust coursehath beene taken in this case, because Aldobrandino is falslyaccused as you your selfe will confesse before midnight, when they aredelivered into your power, that were the murderers of the man. ϸ

ٷվ-ҳйƽÿ칤9.2Сʱ ý:̫Ͷ| ̵2018|棡Ӣ԰һòպˮԼϴ
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