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2020-08-09 17:28:04  Դձ
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Pyrrhus, who had often considered on Lescaes first message,concluded with himselfe; that if any more she moved the same matter:hee would returne her another kinde of answere, wholly yeelding tocontent his Lady; provided, that he might remaine assured,concerning the intyre truth of the motion, and that it was not urgedonely to trie him, wherefore, thus he replyed. Lesca, do not imaginemee so ignorant, as not to know the certaintie of all thy formerallegations, confessing them as freely as thou doest, or canst. Butyet let mee tell thee withall, that I knowe my Lord to be wise andjudicious, and having committed all his affaires to my care and trust:never blame mee to misdoubt, least my Ladie (by his counsell andadvice) make thee the messenger of this motion, therby to call myFidelitie in question.

ƥ䶷廭

THE INDUCTION TO THE SECOND DAY

THE TENTH DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

A fond and foolish opinion overswayed her, that the Scholler wasextraordinarily skilfull in the Art of Nigromancy, and could therebyso over-rule the heart of her lost friend, as hee should bee compelledto love her againe, in as effectuall manner as before; herewithimmediately she acquainted her Lady, who being as rashly credulous, asher maide was opinionative (never considring, that if the Scholler hadany experience in Negromancy, hee would thereby have procured his ownesuccesse) gave releefe to her surmise, in very joviall and comfortablemanner, and entreated her in all kindnes, to know of him, whether hecould worke such a businesse, or no, and (upon his undertaking toeffect it) shee would give absolute assurance, that (in recompencethereof) he should unfainedly obtaine his hearts desire. Ancilla wasquicke and expeditious, in delivering this message to discontentedReniero, whose soule being ready to mount out of his body, onely byconceit of joy; chearefully thus he said within himselfe. GraciousFortune! how highly am I obliged to thee for this so great favour? Nowthou hast blest me with a happy time, to be justly revenged on sowicked a woman, who sought the utter ruine of my life, in recompenceof the unfaigned affection I bare her. Returne to thy Lady (quothhe) and saluting her first on my behalfe, bid her to abandon allcare in this businesse; for, if her amourous Friend were in India, Iwould make him come (in meere despight of his heart) and crave mercyof her for his base transgression. But concerning the meanes how,and in what manner it is to bee done, especially on her ownebehalfe: I will impart it to her so soone as she pleaseth: faile notto tell her so constantly from me, with all my utmost paines at herservice.

ƥ䶷 ɻ

Adriano (on the other side) perceiving how wisely the womanexcused her owne shame and her daughters; to backe her in abusinesse so cunningly begun, he called to Panuccio, saying. Havenot I tolde thee an hundred times, that thou art not fit to lye anywhere, out of thine owne lodging? What a shame is this baseimperfection to thee, by rising and walking thus in the night-time,according as thy dreames doe wantonly delude thee, and cause thee toforsake thy bed, telling nothing but lies and fables, yet avouchingthem for manifest truthes? Assuredly this will procure no meane perillunto thee: Come hither, and keepe in thine owne bedde for meere shame.

Jehannot hearing these words, became exceeding sorrowfull, and saydwithin himselfe; I have lost all the paines which I did thinke to bewell employed, as hoping to have this man converted heere. For, ifhe go to the Court of Rome, and behold there the wickednes of thePriests lives, farewell all hope in me, of ever seeing him to become aChristian. But rather, were he already a Christian, without allquestion he would turne a Jew. And so going neerer to Abraham, hesaid. Alas my loving friend, why shouldst thou undertake such atedious travel, and so great a charge, as thy journey from hence toRome will cost thee? Consider, that to a rich man (as thou art)travaile by land or Sea is full of infinite dangers. Doest thou notthinke, that here are Religious men enow, who wil gladly bestowBaptisme upon thee? To mee therefore it plainely appeareth, thatsuch a voyage is to no purpose. If thou standest upon any doubt orscruple, concerning the faith whereto I wish thee; where canst thoudesire conference with greater Doctours, or men more learned in allrespects, then this famous Cittie doth affoord thee, to resolve theein any questionable case? Thou must thinke, that the Prelates are suchthere, as heere thou seest them to be, and yet they must needes bein much better condition at Rome, because they are neere to theprincipall Pastor. And therefore, if thou wilt credit my counsell,reserve this journey to some time more convenient, when the Jubilee ofgenerall Pardon happeneth, and then (perchance) I will beare theecompany, and go along with thee as in vowed Pilgrimage.

ƥ䶷йҶ ۻ

Within a while after, Melisso being gone from Giosefo, andreturned home to his owne house: hee acquainted a wise and reverendman, with the answere which king Salomon gave him, whereto heereceived this reply. No better or truer advise could possibly be givenyou, for well you know, that you love not any man; but the bountifulbanquets you bestow on them, is more in respect of your ownevaine-glory, then any kind affection you beare to them: Learne then tolove men, as Salomon advised, and you shall be beloved of them againe.Thus our unruly Wife became mildely reclaimed, and the yong Gentleman,by loving others, found the fruits of reciporall affection.

Two neere dwelling Neighbours, the one beeing named SpineloccioTavena, and the other Zeppa di Mino, frequenting each others companydaily. together; Spinelloccio Cuckolded his Friend and Neighbour.Which happening to the knowledge of Zeppa, he prevailed so well withthe Wife of Spinelloccio, that he being lockt up in a Chest, herevenged his wrong at that instant, so that neyther of them complainedof his misfortune.

They which tarried, when they were gone, considering partly on thereasons alleadged by Titus, and partly terrified by his latestspeeches; became induced, to like well of his alliance and amitie,as (with common consent) they concluded: that it was much better toaccept Titus as their kinsman (seeing Gisippus had made manifestrefusall thereof) than to lose the kinred of the one, and procurethe hatred of the other. Wherefore they went to seeke Titus, andsaid unto him, they were very well contented that Sophronia should beehis Wife, hee their deare and loving kinsman, and Gisippus toremaine their much respected friend. And embracing one another, makinga solemne feast, such as in the like cases is necessarilie required,they departed from him, presently sending Sophronia to him, who makinga vertue of necessity, converted her love (in short time after) toTitus, in as effectuall manner, as formerly shee had done to Gisippus,and so was sent away with him to Rome, where she was received andwelcommed with very great honour.

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Most worthy Ladies, there wants no store of men and women, thatare so simple, as to credit for a certainty, that so soon as a yongvirgin hath the veile put on hir head, and the black Cowle given tocover withall, she is no longer a woman, nor more sensible of feminineaffections, then as if in turning Nun, shee became converted to astone. And if (perchance) they heard some matters, contrary to theirformer perswasion; then they grow so furiously offended, as if one hadcommitted a most foule and enormous sinne, directly against the courseof Nature. And the torrent of this opinion burries them on soviolently, that they wil admit no leisure to consider, how (in sucha scope of liberty) they have power to doe what they list, yeabeyond all meanes of sufficient satisfying, never remembring howpotent the priviledge of idlenes is, especially when it is backt bysolitude. In like manner, there are other people now, who verilybeleeve, that the Spade and Pickaxe, grosse feeding and labour, doquench al sensual and fleshly concupiscence, yea, in such as tilland husband the ground, by making them dull, blockish, and (almost)meere senslesse of understanding. But I will approve (according as theQueene hath commanded me, and within the compasse of her direction) bya short and pleasant Tale; how greatly they are abused by errour, thatbuild upon so weake a foundation.

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ƥ䶷ļһ̣Ҹձ The Pilgrime discoursed to her, even from the one end to theother, the history of her husbands sad disasters, telling her, howmany yeeres since she was espoused to him, and many other importantmatters, which well shee knew, and was greatly amazed thereat,thinking him verily to be a Prophet, and kneeling at his feete,entreated him very earnestly, that if he were come to deliver herFather Aldobrandino from death, to doe it speedily, because the timewas very short. The Pilgrime appearing to be a man of great holinesse,saide. Rise up Madame, refraine from weeping, and observeattentively what I shall say; yet with this caution, that you neverreveale it to any person whatsoever. This tribulation whereinto youare falne, (as by revelation I am faithfully informed) is for agrievous sinne by you heretofore committed, whereof divine mercy iswilling to purge you, and to make a perfect amends by a sensiblefeeling of this affliction; as seeking your sound and absoluterecovery, least you fall into farre greater danger then before. Goodman (quoth shee) I am burthened with many sinnes, and doe not know forwhich any amends should be made by me; any one sooner then other:wherefore if you have intelligence thereof, for charities sake tell itme, and I will doe so much as lieth in me, to make a full satisfactionfor it. Madame, answered the Pilgrime, I know well enough what itis, and will demand it no more of you, to winne any furtherknowledge thereof, then I have already: but because in revealing ityour selfe, it may touch you with the more true compunction ofsoule; let us goe to the point indeede, and tell mee, doe youremember, that at any time you were married to an Husband, or no? ϸ

1000ԪԸ߹ְܼ| ̵2018|ҥ˳ᾩֹͣҵ񣿼ٵģ

ƥ䶷˼ɽ¹ڷײԶSARSH7N9 By this, and divers other like worthy deeds, not onely did he winthe hearts of his subjects; but gave occasion to the who world beside,to renowne his fame to all succeeding posterity. Whereto (in thesemore wretched times of ours) few or none bend the sway of theirunderstanding: but rather how to bee cruell and tyrranous Lords, andthereby win the hatred of their people. ϸ

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