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ַ͡:a g 9 559 v i p1˴ С6eXrD20530698KB أbx1td68189569
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ڣ2020-08-10 22:27:21
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1.ַ:a g 9 559 v i p1Eyes, when you gaz'd upon her Angell beauty;
2.The Abbot pretending great admiration at this accident, called hisMonkes about him, all labouring by rubbing his temples, throwingcold water and vinegar in his face, to revive him againe; alleagingthat some fume or vapour in the stomacke, had thus over-awed hisunderstanding faculties, and quite deprived him of life indeede. Atlength, when by tasting the pulse, and all their best employed paines,they saw that their labour was spent in vaine; the Abbot used suchperswasions to the Monkes, that they all beleeved him to be dead:whereupon they sent for his wife and friends, who crediting as much asthe rest did, were very sad and sorrowfull for him.
3.And sleights of coy disdaine.
4.Such a sacred sweete,
5.In the nature and course of a Rover or Pirate, so put thence to sea,coasting all about Barbarie, robbing and spoyling such as he met with;who were of no greater strength then himselfe: wherein Fortune wasso favourable to him, that he became wealthy in a very short while.But as felicities are not alwayes permanent, so he and hisfollowers, not contenting themselves with sufficient riches: by greedyseeking to get more, happened to be taken by certaine ships of theSarazins, and so were robbed themselves of all that they had gotten,yet they resisted them stoutly a long while together, though it provedto the losse of many lives among them. When the Sarazens had sunke hisship in the Sea, they tooke him with them to Thunis, where he wasimprisoned, and lived in extreamest misery.
6.The Sunne was now somewhat farre declined, and the heatesextremity well worne away: when the Tales of the seaven Ladies andthree Gentlemen were thus finished, whereupon their Queenepleasantly said. For this day (faire company) there remaineth nothingmore to be done under my regiment, but onely to bestow a new Queeneupon you, who (according to her judgement) must take her turne, anddispose what next is to be done, for continuing our time in honestpleasure. And although the day should endure till darke night; inregard, that when some time is taken before, the better preparationmay bee made for occasions to follow, to the end also, that whatsoeverthe new Queene shall please to appoint, may be the better fitted forthe morrow: I am of opinion, that at the same houre as we now cease,the following dayes shall severally begin. And therefore, in reverenceto him that giveth life to all things, and in hope of comfort by oursecond day; Madam Philomena, a most wise young Lady, shall governeas Queene this our Kingdome.

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1.Because it appeareth in my judgement (faire Ladyes) that theSchollers cruelty hath much displeased you, making you moremelancholly then this time requireth: I holde it therefore veryconvenient, that your contristed spirits should be chearfully revived,with matter more pleasing and delightfull. And therefore, I mean toreport a Novell of a certaine man, who too an injury done him, in muchmilder manner, and revenged his wrong more moderately, then thefurious incensed Scholler did. Whereby you may comprehend, that itis sufficient for any man, and so he ought to esteeme it, to serveanother with the same sawce, which the offending party caused himfirst to taste of: without coveting any stricter revenge, then agreethwith the quality of the injury received.
2.DOTH OFTENTIMES APPEASE THE FURIOUS CHOLLER OF AN
3.The servant, who had no great good will to kill her, very easilygrew pittifull, tooke off her upper garments, and gave her a pooreragged doublet, a sillie Chapperone, and such small store of moneyas he had, desiring her to forsake that Country, and so left her towalke on foote out of the valley. When he came to his Maister, and haddelivered him her garments, he assured him, that he had not onelyaccomplished his commaund, but also was most secure from anydiscovery: because he had no sooner done the deede, but foure orfive very ravenous Woolves, came presently running to the deadbodie, and gave it buriall in their bellyes. Bernardo soone afterreturning to Geneway, was much blamed for such unkinde cruelty tohis wife; but his constant avouching of her treason to him(according then to the Countries custome) did cleare him from allpursuite of Law.
4.Having provided her selfe of a Nurse, they altogether went aboardagaine, setting sayle for Naples to visit her Parents; but itchanced quite contrary to her expectation, because by stormie windesand weather, the vessell being bound for Naples, was hurried to theIle of Ponzo, where entring into a small Port of the Sea, theyconcluded to make their aboade, till a time more furtherous shouldfavour their voyage.
5.My Lord, when Ghinotto was yonger then now he is, he studyedPhysicke, and he commanded me to tell you, that the very bestmedicine, he could ever learne, against any disease in the stomacke,was this which he had provided for your Lordship, as an especialpreparative, and which he should finde to be very comfortable. TheAbbot, who had a better stomacke to eate, then any will or desire totalke: although hee did it somewhat disdainfully, yet hee eate up boththe toastes, and roundly dranke the Glasse of Bastard. Afterward,divers other speeches passed betweene them, the one still advisingin Phisicall manner, and the other seeming to care little for it:but moved many questions concerning Ghinotto, and earnestly requestingto see him. Such speeches as savoured of the Abbots discontentment,and came from him in passion; were clouded with courteousacceptance, and not the least signe of any mislike: but assuring hisLordship, that Ghinotto intended very shortly to see him, and sothey parted for that time.Nor returned he any more, till the next morning with the like twotoastes of bread, and such another Glasse of white Bastard, as hehad brought him at the first, continuing the same course for diversdayes after: till the Abbot had eaten (and very hungerly too) a prettystore of dryed Beanes, which Ghinotto purposely, (yet secretly) hadhidden in the Chamber. Whereupon he demaunded of him (as seeming to beso enjoyned by his pretended master) in what temper he found hisstomacke now? I should finde my stomacke well enough (answered theLord Abbot) if I could get forth of thy masters fingers, and then havesome good food to feed on: for his medicines have made me so soundlystomackt, that I am ready to starve with hunger.
6.A most sacred thing therefore is (ordiall amity, worthy not onely ofsinguler reverence, but also to be honoured with eternallcommendation, as being the onely wise Mother of all magnificence andhonesty, the Sister of Charity and Gratitude, the enemy to hatredand avarice, and which is alwayes ready (without attending to berequested) to extend all vertuous actions to others, which she wouldhave done to her selfe. Her rare and divine effects, in these contrarytimes of ours, are not to be found between two such persons, whichis a mighty fault, and greatly checketh the miserable covetousnesse ofmen, who respecting nothing but onely their particular benefit; havebanished true Amity, to the utmost confines of the whole earth, andsent her into perpetuall exile.

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1.When the King perceyved that Madame Pampinea had ended herdiscourse, he sat sadly a pretty while, without uttering one word, butafterward spake thus. Little goodnesse appeared in the beginning ofthis Novell, because it ministred occasion of mirth; yet the endingproved better, and I could wish, that worse inflictions had falne onthe venerious Friar. Then turning towards Madam Lauretta, he said;Lady, do you tell us a better tale, if possible it may be. Shesmiling, thus answered the King: Sir, you are over-cruelly bentagainst poore Lovers, in desiring, that their amourous processionsshould have harsh and sinister concludings. Neverthelesse, inobedience to your severe command, among three persons amourouslyperplexed, I will relate an unhappy ending; whereas all may be saideto speede as unfortunately, being equally alike, in enjoying the issueof their desires, and thus I purpose to proceed.
2.For Lying, Loytring, Lazinesse,
3.FROM PERILL
4.Madame Francesca, a Widdow of Pistoya, being affected by twoFlorentine Gentlemen, the one named Rinuccio Palermini, and theother Alessandro Chiarmontesi, and she bearing no good will toeyther of them; ingeniously freed her selfe from both theirimportunate suites. One of them she caused to lye as dead in agrave, and the other to fetch him from thence: so neither of themaccomplishing what they were enjoyned, fayled of obtaining his hopedexpectation.
5.Then the Children began to cry, saying; that they would tarriestil by the good olde man, because he loved them better then theirMaster did; whereat both the Lady and the Count began to smile. TheCount, a poore Begger, and not as Father to so great a Lady, arose,and did her humble reverence, because she was now a Noble Woman,conceyving wonderfull joy in his soule, to see her so faire and goodlya creature: yet could she take no knowledge of him, Age, want, andmisery had so mightily altered him; his head all white, his beardwithout any comly forme, his Garments so poore, and his face sowrinkled, leane and meager, that he seemed rather some Carter, thena Count. And Gianetta perceiving that when her Children were fetchtaway, they returned againe to the olde man, and would not leave him,she desired their Maister to let them alone.While thus the Children continued making much of the good olde man,Lord Andrew Mandevile, Father to Sir Roger, came into the Hall, asbeing so willed to doe by the Childrens Schoolemaster. He being ahastie-minded man, and one that ever-despised Gianetta before, butmuch more since her marriage to his sonne, angerly said; Let themalone with a mischeefe, and so befall them, their best company oughtto bee with beggers, for so they are bred and borne by the Mothersside: and therefore it is no mervaile, if like will to like, a beggersbrats to keepe company with beggers. The Count hearing thesecontemptible wordes, was not a little greeved thereat; and althoughhis courage was greater then his poore condition would permit him toexpresse; yet, clouding all injuries with noble patience, hangingdowne his head, and shedding many a salt teare, endured this reproach,as hee had done many, both before and after.
6.SUBJECT: BUT EVERY ONE REMAINETH AT LIBERTY, TO

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1.MAY FALL OUT TO BEE, ESPECIALLY WHEN A MAN FINDS HIMSELFE
2.These merry Laddes meant not to leave him so; but sitting one day inserious consultation, and a third man in their companie, namedNello; they all three layde their braines in steep, by what means towash their mouths well, and Calandrino to bee at the cost thereof.
3.Yet hopefull thoughts doe find but poore reliefe.
4For truth lives not in men,
5Then pausing a while, and sodainely rapping out a Lovers Oath ortwo, thus he proceeded. My dearest Bruno, thou shalt see how I cantickle my Gitterne, and what good sport will ensue thereon. If thoudost observe me with judgement, why man, I am not so old as I seeme tobe, and she could perceive it at the very first view; yea, and sheshall finde it so too, when we have leysure to consult upon furtheroccasions: I finde my selfe in such a free and frolicke jocunditieof spirit, that I will make her to follow me, even as a fond womandoth after her child.

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(FPX7871525457))

  • 07-28

    THE INDUCTION TO THE FIFT DAY

  • ½ 07-28

    And then the Queene, somewhat offended at the folly of the formercontroversie, commanded Madame Philomena, that she should givebeginning to the dayes Novels: which (in dutifull manner) sheeundertooke to doe, and seating her selfe in formall fashion, withmodest and very gracious gesture, thus she began.

  • 07-28

    Alas sweete Belcolore answered Sir Simon, I never beare any such sumabout me, for men of our profession, doe seldome carry any money atall: but beleeve me on my word, before Saturday come, I will not faileto bring them hither. Oh Sir (quoth Belcolore) you men are quickepromisers, but slow performers. Doe you thinke to use me, as pooreBillezza was, who trusted to as faire words, and found her selfedeceived? Now Sir Simon, her example in being made scandall to theworld, is a sufficient warning for me: if you be not so provided,goe and make use of your friend, for I am not otherwise to be moved.Nay Belcolore (quoth he) I hope you will not serve me so, but myword shall be of better worth with you. Consider the conveniency oftime, wee being so privately here alone: whereas at my returninghither againe, some hinderance may thwart me, and the like opportunitybe never obtained. Sir, she) you have heard my resolution; if you willfetche the Florines, doe; otherwise, walke about your businesse, for Iam a woman of my word.

  • 07-28

    In the Spring season, etc.

  • 07-27

    {Then catching him fast in her armes, thus she answered. Now Iplainly perceive, my dearest Salabetto, that the love thou bearestme is true and perfect; when, without expectation of beingrequested, thou art readie to succour me in such an urgent neede,and with so faire a summe of Florines. Sufficiently was I thine ownebefore, but now am much more ingaged by so high deserving; with thisparticular acknowledgement for ever, that my Brothers head wasredeemed by thy goodnesse onely. Heaven beareth me record, howunwilling I am to be beholding in this kind, considring that you are aMerchant, and Merchants furnish al their affairs with ready monis: butseeing necessity constraineth me, and I make no doubt of repaimentat the time appointed: I . p shall the more boldly accept yourkindnes, with this absolute promise beside, that I wil rather sell allthe houses I have, then breake my honest word with you.

  • 07-26

    Upon this his private frequentation with the Abbot, at last heobserved, that Ferando had a very beautifull woman to his Wife, withwhom he grew so deeply in love, as he had no other meditationseither by day or night, but how to become acceptable in her favour.Neverthelesse, he concealed his amorous passions privately tohimselfe, and could plainely perceive, that although Ferando (in allthings else) was meerely a simple fellow, and more like an Idiot, thenof any sensible apprehension: yet was he wise enough in loving hisWife, keeping her carfully out of all company, as one (indeede) veryjealous, least any should kisse her, but onely himselfe, which drovethe Abbot into despaire, for ever attaining the issue of his desire.Yet being subtill, crafty, and cautelous, he wrought so on theflexible nature of Ferando, that hee brought his wife with himdivers dayes to the Monasterie; where they walked in the goodlyGarden, discoursing on the beatitudes of eternall life, as also themost holy deedes of men and women, long since departed out of thislife, in mervailous civill and modest manner. Yet all these were buttraines to a further intention, for the Abbot must needes be herghostly Father, and she come to be confessed by him; which the fooleFerando tooke as an especiall favour, and therefore he gave hisconsent the sooner.}

  • ֮ 07-26

    By this time, Conrado and his wife, who had followed closely afterthe hounds, was come thither, and seeing what had hapned, looking onthe Lady, who was become blacke, swarthy, meager, and hairy, theywondered not a little at her, and she a great deale more at them. When(uppon her request) Conrado had checkt backe his hounds, theyprevailed so much by earnest intreaties, to know what she was, and thereason of her living there; that she intirely related her quality,unfortunate accidents, and strange determination for living there.Which when the Gentleman had heard, who very well knew her husband,compassion forced teares from his eyes, and earnestly he laboured bykinde perswasions, to alter so cruell a deliberation; making anhonourable offer, for conducting her home to his owne dwelling,where shee should remaine with him in noble respect, as if she werehis owne sister, without parting from him, till Fortune should smileas fairely on her, as ever she had done before.

  • 07-26

    These words were not a little welcome to my Lord Abbot, because(thereby) he halfe assured himselfe, that Fortune had laid open thepath to his hoped pleasures. Whereupon he said. Deare daughter, I makeno question to the contrary, but it must needes be an exceedinginfelicity, to so faire and goodly a young woman as you are, to beplagued with so sottish an husband, brainsick, and without the useof common understanding; but yet subject to a more hellishaffliction then all these, namely jealousie, and therefore you beingin this wofull manner tormented, your tribulations are not only somuch the more credited, but also as amply grieved for, and pittied. Inwhich heavy and irksome perturbations, I see not any meanes of remedy,but onely one, being a kinde of physicke (beyond all other) to curehim of his foolish jealousie; which medicine is very familiar to me,because I know best how to compound it, alwayes provided, that you canbe of so strong a capacity, as to be secret in what I shall say untoyou.

  • 07-25

    So soone as Madam Flammetta had ended her Song; Dioneus, who sate byher, smiling said. Truly Madam, you may do us a great courtesie, toexpresse your selfe more plainly to us all, least (thorow ignorance)the possession may be imposed on your selfe, and so you remaine themore offended.

  • ̨ 07-23

    {The Physitian laboured to excuse himselfe, declaring his misfortunesat large, and into what a filthy place he was throwne. It maketh nomatter (answered Buffalmaco) I would you had bin throwen from offthe Bridge into Arno, where you might have beene recommended to theDivell and all his Saints. Did not I tell you so much before. Ingood sadnesse (quoth the Doctor) I neyther commended my selfe toGod, nor any of his Saints. How? sayde Buffalmaco, I am sure youwill not maintaine an untruth, you used a kind of recommendation:for our messenger told us, that you talked of God, S. Dominicke, andyour good Angell, whom you desired to assist you, being soaffrighted with feare, that you trembled like a leafe upon a tree, notknowing indeede where you were. Thus have you unfaithfully dealtwith us, as never any man shall doe the like againe, in seekinghonour, and losing it through your own negligence.

  • 07-23

    Reniero, when some three houres of the afternoone were overpast,awaked from sleeping: and remembring Madame Helena, he went to seein what estate she was; as also to send his servant unto dinner,because he had fasted all that day. She perceyving his arrivall, beingaltogether weake, faint, and wonderously over-wearied, she crept onher knees to a corner of the Turret, and calling to him, spake in thismanner. Reniero, thy revenge exceedeth al manhoode and respect: For,if thou wast almost frozen in my Court, thou hast roasted me all daylong on this Tower, yea, meerly broyled my poore naked bodie, besidestarving mee thorough want of Food and drinke. Be now then somercifull (for manhoods sake) as to come uppe hither, and inflict thaton me, which mine owne hands are not strong enough to do, I meanethe ending of my loathed and wearisome life, for I desire it beyondall comfort else, and I shall honour thee in the performance of it. Ifthou deny me this gracious favour; at least send me uppe a glasse ofWater, onely to moisten my mouth, which my teares (being all meerlydried up) are not able to doe, so extreame is the violence of theSunnes burning heate.