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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:维拉亚特达吉斯坦 大小:Mm7B2FzX14230KB 下载:uHFVY9Ne54685次
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日期:2020-08-06 15:36:02
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周春声

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I have come, sir replied Telemachus, "to see if you can tell meanything about my father. I am being eaten out of house and home; myfair estate is being wasted, and my house is full of miscreants whokeep killing great numbers of my sheep and oxen, on the pretence ofpaying their addresses to my mother. Therefore, I am suppliant at yourknees if haply you may tell me about my father's melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller; for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for myself, but tell me in all plainness exactlywhat you saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal serviceeither by word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed by theTrojans, bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
2.  And Jove answered, "What, O Lord of the Earthquake, are youtalking about? The gods are by no means wanting in respect for you. Itwould be monstrous were they to insult one so old and honoured asyou are. As regards mortals, however, if any of them is indulging ininsolence and treating you disrespectfully, it will always rest withyourself to deal with him as you may think proper, so do just as youplease."
3.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.
4.  Then Jove's daughter Minerva came up to them, having assumed theform and voice of Mentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her, and saidto his son Telemachus, "Telemachus, now that are about to fight inan engagement, which will show every man's mettle, be sure not todisgrace your ancestors, who were eminent for their strength andcourage all the world over."
5.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Menelausrose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to his comelyfeet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. Then, taking a seat near Telemachus hesaid:
6.  The maids looked at one another and laughed, while pretty Melanthobegan to gibe at him contemptuously. She was daughter to Dolius, buthad been brought up by Penelope, who used to give her toys to playwith, and looked after her when she was a child; but in spite of allthis she showed no consideration for the sorrows of her mistress,and used to misconduct herself with Eurymachus, with whom she was inlove.

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1.  On this Telemachus strode off through the yards, brooding hisrevenge upon the When he reached home he stood his spear against abearing-post of the cloister, crossed the stone floor of thecloister itself, and went inside.
2.  On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,
3.  "And the goddess answered, 'Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, you shallnone of you stay here any longer if you do not want to, but there isanother journey which you have got to take before you can sailhomewards. You must go to the house of Hades and of dread Proserpineto consult the ghost of the blind Theban prophet Teiresias whosereason is still unshaken. To him alone has Proserpine left hisunderstanding even in death, but the other ghosts flit aboutaimlessly.'
4.  "My sons," said he, "make haste to do as I shall bid you. I wishfirst and foremost to propitiate the great goddess Minerva, whomanifested herself visibly to me during yesterday's festivities. Go,then, one or other of you to the plain, tell the stockman to look meout a heifer, and come on here with it at once. Another must go toTelemachus's ship, and invite all the crew, leaving two men only incharge of the vessel. Some one else will run and fetch Laerceus thegoldsmith to gild the horns of the heifer. The rest, stay all of youwhere you are; tell the maids in the house to prepare an excellentdinner, and to fetch seats, and logs of wood for a burnt offering.Tell them also- to bring me some clear spring water."
5.  Telemachus took this speech as of good omen and rose at once, for hewas bursting with what he had to say. He stood in the middle of theassembly and the good herald Pisenor brought him his staff. Then,turning to Aegyptius, "Sir," said he, "it is I, as you will shortlylearn, who have convened you, for it is I who am the most aggrieved. Ihave not got wind of any host approaching about which I would warnyou, nor is there any matter of public moment on which I wouldspeak. My grieveance is purely personal, and turns on two greatmisfortunes which have fallen upon my house. The first of these is theloss of my excellent father, who was chief among all you here present,and was like a father to every one of you; the second is much moreserious, and ere long will be the utter ruin of my estate. The sons ofall the chief men among you are pestering my mother to marry themagainst her will. They are afraid to go to her father Icarius,asking him to choose the one he likes best, and to provide marriagegifts for his daughter, but day by day they keep hanging about myfather's house, sacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for theirbanquets, and never giving so much as a thought to the quantity ofwine they drink. No estate can stand such recklessness; we have now noUlysses to ward off harm from our doors, and I cannot hold my ownagainst them. I shall never all my days be as good a man as he was,still I would indeed defend myself if I had power to do so, for Icannot stand such treatment any longer; my house is being disgracedand ruined. Have respect, therefore, to your own consciences and topublic opinion. Fear, too, the wrath of heaven, lest the gods shouldbe displeased and turn upon you. I pray you by Jove and Themis, who isthe beginning and the end of councils, [do not] hold back, my friends,and leave me singlehanded- unless it be that my brave father Ulyssesdid some wrong to the Achaeans which you would now avenge on me, byaiding and abetting these suitors. Moreover, if I am to be eaten outof house and home at all, I had rather you did the eatingyourselves, for I could then take action against you to somepurpose, and serve you with notices from house to house till I gotpaid in full, whereas now I have no remedy."
6.  "I wish, child," answered Euryclea, "that you would take themanagement of the house into your own hands altogether, and look afterall the property yourself. But who is to go with you and light youto the store room? The maids would have so, but you would not letthem.

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1.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, the sons ofAutolycus went out with their hounds hunting, and Ulysses went too.They climbed the wooded slopes of Parnassus and soon reached itsbreezy upland valleys; but as the sun was beginning to beat upon thefields, fresh-risen from the slow still currents of Oceanus, they cameto a mountain dell. The dogs were in front searching for the tracks ofthe beast they were chasing, and after them came the sons ofAutolycus, among whom was Ulysses, close behind the dogs, and he had along spear in his hand. Here was the lair of a huge boar among somethick brushwood, so dense that the wind and rain could not get throughit, nor could the sun's rays pierce it, and the ground underneathlay thick with fallen leaves. The boar heard the noise of the men'sfeet, and the hounds baying on every side as the huntsmen came up tohim, so rushed from his lair, raised the bristles on his neck, andstood at bay with fire flashing from his eyes. Ulysses was the firstto raise his spear and try to drive it into the brute, but the boarwas too quick for him, and charged him sideways, ripping him above theknee with a gash that tore deep though it did not reach the bone. Asfor the boar, Ulysses hit him on the right shoulder, and the pointof the spear went right through him, so that he fell groaning in thedust until the life went out of him. The sons of Autolycus busiedthemselves with the carcass of the boar, and bound Ulysses' wound;then, after saying a spell to stop the bleeding, they went home asfast as they could. But when Autolycus and his sons had thoroughlyhealed Ulysses, they made him some splendid presents, and sent himback to Ithaca with much mutual good will. When he got back, hisfather and mother were rejoiced to see him, and asked him all aboutit, and how he had hurt himself to get the scar; so he told them howthe boar had ripped him when he was out hunting with Autolycus and hissons on Mount Parnassus.
2.  "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."
3.  As he spoke he drew his keen blade of bronze, sharpened on bothsides, and with a loud cry sprang towards Ulysses, but Ulyssesinstantly shot an arrow into his breast that caught him by thenipple and fixed itself in his liver. He dropped his sword and felldoubled up over his table. The cup and all the meats went over on tothe ground as he smote the earth with his forehead in the agonies ofdeath, and he kicked the stool with his feet until his eyes wereclosed in darkness.
4.  BOOK XXIV.
5.   "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'
6.  "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.

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1.  Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.
2.  And Ulysses answered, "A man, goddess, may know a great deal, butyou are so constantly changing your appearance that when he meetsyou it is a hard matter for him to know whether it is you or not. Thismuch, however, I know exceedingly well; you were very kind to me aslong as we Achaeans were fighting before Troy, but from the day onwhich we went on board ship after having sacked the city of Priam, andheaven dispersed us- from that day, Minerva, I saw no more of you, andcannot ever remember your coming to my ship to help me in adifficulty; I had to wander on sick and sorry till the godsdelivered me from evil and I reached the city of the Phaeacians, whereyou encouraged me and took me into the town. And now, I beseech you inyour father's name, tell me the truth, for I do not believe I amreally back in Ithaca. I am in some other country and you aremocking me and deceiving me in all you have been saying. Tell methen truly, have I really got back to my own country?"
3.  As he spoke he picked up a heifer's foot from the meat-basket inwhich it lay, and threw it at Ulysses, but Ulysses turned his head alittle aside, and avoided it, smiling grimly Sardinian fashion as hedid so, and it hit the wall, not him. On this Telemachus spokefiercely to Ctesippus, "It is a good thing for you," said he, "thatthe stranger turned his head so that you missed him. If you had hithim I should have run you through with my spear, and your father wouldhave had to see about getting you buried rather than married in thishouse. So let me have no more unseemly behaviour from any of you,for I am grown up now to the knowledge of good and evil and understandwhat is going on, instead of being the child that I have beenheretofore. I have long seen you killing my sheep and making free withmy corn and wine: I have put up with this, for one man is no match formany, but do me no further violence. Still, if you wish to kill me,kill me; I would far rather die than see such disgraceful scenes dayafter day- guests insulted, and men dragging the women servantsabout the house in an unseemly way."
4、  "Ulysses," replied Alcinous, "not one of us who sees you has anyidea that you are a charlatan or a swindler. I know there are manypeople going about who tell such plausible stories that it is veryhard to see through them, but there is a style about your languagewhich assures me of your good disposition. Moreover you have toldthe story of your own misfortunes, and those of the Argives, as thoughyou were a practised bard; but tell me, and tell me true, whetheryou saw any of the mighty heroes who went to Troy at the same timewith yourself, and perished there. The evenings are still at theirlongest, and it is not yet bed time- go on, therefore, with yourdivine story, for I could stay here listening till to-morrowmorning, so long as you will continue to tell us of your adventures."
5、  "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.

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  • 穆尔希德 08-05

      When Euryclea heard this she unfastened the door of the women's roomand came out, following Telemachus. She found Ulysses among thecorpses bespattered with blood and filth like a lion that has justbeen devouring an ox, and his breast and both his cheeks are allbloody, so that he is a fearful sight; even so was Ulyssesbesmirched from head to foot with gore. When she saw all the corpsesand such a quantity of blood, she was beginning to cry out for joy,for she saw that a great deed had been done; but Ulysses checkedher, "Old woman," said he, "rejoice in silence; restrain yourself, anddo not make any noise about it; it is an unholy thing to vaunt overdead men. Heaven's doom and their own evil deeds have brought thesemen to destruction, for they respected no man in the whole world,neither rich nor poor, who came near them, and they have come to a badend as a punishment for their wickedness and folly. Now, however, tellme which of the women in the house have misconducted themselves, andwho are innocent."

  • 伊森-斯科尔尼科 08-05

      Ulysses answered, "Telemachus, you ought not to be so immeasurablyastonished at my being really here. There is no other Ulysses who willcome hereafter. Such as I am, it is I, who after long wandering andmuch hardship have got home in the twentieth year to my own country.What you wonder at is the work of the redoubtable goddess Minerva, whodoes with me whatever she will, for she can do what she pleases. Atone moment she makes me like a beggar, and the next I am a young manwith good clothes on my back; it is an easy matter for the gods wholive in heaven to make any man look either rich or poor."

  • 蔡铭超 08-05

       "'My friends,' said I, 'we have meat and drink in the ship, let usmind, therefore, and not touch the cattle, or we shall suffer forit; for these cattle and sheep belong to the mighty sun, who seesand gives ear to everything. And again they promised that they wouldobey.

  • 张爱民 08-05

      On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,

  • 朱炼 08-04

    {  "For shame," replied Minerva, "why, any one else would trust a worseally than myself, even though that ally were only a mortal and lesswise than I am. Am I not a goddess, and have I not protected youthroughout in all your troubles? I tell you plainly that even thoughthere were fifty bands of men surrounding us and eager to kill us, youshould take all their sheep and cattle, and drive them away withyou. But go to sleep; it is a very bad thing to lie awake all night,and you shall be out of your troubles before long."

  • 林晓培 08-03

      With these words he girded the sword about his shoulders and towardssundown the presents began to make their appearance, as the servantsof the donors kept bringing them to the house of King Alcinous; herehis sons received them, and placed them under their mother's charge.Then Alcinous led the way to the house and bade his guests taketheir seats.}

  • 陈康 08-03

      But she would not give him full victory as yet, for she wished stillfurther to prove his own prowess and that of his brave son, so sheflew up to one of the rafters in the roof of the cloister and sat uponit in the form of a swallow.

  • 吴洋成 08-03

      "My mother," answered Telemachus, tells me I am son to Ulysses,but it is a wise child that knows his own father. Would that I wereson to one who had grown old upon his own estates, for, since youask me, there is no more ill-starred man under heaven than he who theytell me is my father."

  • 霍峻 08-02

       The rest approved his words, and thereon men servants poured waterover the hands of the guests, while pages filled the mixing-bowls withwine and water and handed it round after giving every man hisdrink-offering. Then, when they had made their offerings and had drunkeach as much as he desired, Ulysses craftily said:

  • 蔡廷锴 07-31

    {  "While we were doing all this, Circe, who knew that we had gotback from the house of Hades, dressed herself and came to us as fastas she could; and her maid servants came with her bringing us bread,meat, and wine. Then she stood in the midst of us and said, 'Youhave done a bold thing in going down alive to the house of Hades,and you will have died twice, to other people's once; now, then,stay here for the rest of the day, feast your fill, and go on withyour voyage at daybreak tomorrow morning. In the meantime I willtell Ulysses about your course, and will explain everything to himso as to prevent your suffering from misadventure either by land orsea.'

  • 庄锦田 07-31

      Thus did he speak, and the others applauded his saying; they thenall of them went inside the buildings.

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