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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:何志中 大小:4l46y4rr31984KB 下载:pQyeVcGf46384次
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日期:2020-08-13 02:21:32
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:
2.  When she heard the sure proofs Ulysses now gave her, she fairlybroke down. She flew weeping to his side, flung her arms about hisneck, and kissed him. "Do not be angry with me Ulysses," she cried,"you, who are the wisest of mankind. We have suffered, both of us.Heaven has denied us the happiness of spending our youth, and ofgrowing old, together; do not then be aggrieved or take it amissthat I did not embrace you thus as soon as I saw you. I have beenshuddering all the time through fear that someone might come hereand deceive me with a lying story; for there are many very wickedpeople going about. Jove's daughter Helen would never have yieldedherself to a man from a foreign country, if she had known that thesons of Achaeans would come after her and bring her back. Heaven putit in her heart to do wrong, and she gave no thought to that sin,which has been the source of all our sorrows. Now, however, that youhave convinced me by showing that you know all about our bed (which nohuman being has ever seen but you and I and a single maid servant, thedaughter of Actor, who was given me by my father on my marriage, andwho keeps the doors of our room) hard of belief though I have been Ican mistrust no longer."
3.  As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.
4.  But Neptune did not forget the threats with which he had alreadythreatened Ulysses, so he took counsel with Jove. "Father Jove,"said he, "I shall no longer be held in any sort of respect among yougods, if mortals like the Phaeacians, who are my own flesh andblood, show such small regard for me. I said I would Ulysses gethome when he had suffered sufficiently. I did not say that he shouldnever get home at all, for I knew you had already nodded your headabout it, and promised that he should do so; but now they have broughthim in a ship fast asleep and have landed him in Ithaca afterloading him with more magnificent presents of bronze, gold, andraiment than he would ever have brought back from Troy, if he hadhad his share of the spoil and got home without misadventure."
5.  Now Neptune had gone off to the Ethiopians, who are at the world'send, and lie in two halves, the one looking West and the other East.He had gone there to accept a hecatomb of sheep and oxen, and wasenjoying himself at his festival; but the other gods met in thehouse of Olympian Jove, and the sire of gods and men spoke first. Atthat moment he was thinking of Aegisthus, who had been killed byAgamemnon's son Orestes; so he said to the other gods:
6.  "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."

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1.  "At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, forshe was of a good natural disposition; moreover there was a bardwith her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out forTroy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven hadcounselled her destruction, Aegisthus thus this bard off to a desertisland and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon- afterwhich she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus. Then heoffered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated manytemples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyondhis expectations.
2.  Ulysses made no answer, but bowed his head and brooded. Then a thirdman, Philoetius, joined them, who was bringing in a barren heiferand some goats. These were brought over by the boatmen who are thereto take people over when any one comes to them. So Philoetius made hisheifer and his goats secure under the gatehouse, and then went up tothe swineherd. "Who, Swineherd," said he, "is this stranger that islately come here? Is he one of your men? What is his family? Wheredoes he come from? Poor fellow, he looks as if he had been somegreat man, but the gods give sorrow to whom they will- even to kingsif it so pleases them
3.  So saying she lashed the mules with her whip and they left theriver. The mules drew well and their hoofs went up and down upon theroad. She was careful not to go too fast for Ulysses and the maids whowere following on foot along with the waggon, so she plied her whipwith judgement. As the sun was going down they came to the sacredgrove of Minerva, and there Ulysses sat down and prayed to themighty daughter of Jove.
4.  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."
5.  "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."
6.  On this she came down from her upper room, and while doing so sheconsidered whether she should keep at a distance from her husbandand question him, or whether she should at once go up to him andembrace him. When, however, she had crossed the stone floor of thecloister, she sat down opposite Ulysses by the fire, against thewall at right angles [to that by which she had entered], while Ulyssessat near one of the bearing-posts, looking upon the ground, andwaiting to see what his wife would say to him when she saw him. Fora long time she sat silent and as one lost in amazement. At one momentshe looked him full in the face, but then again directly, she wasmisled by his shabby clothes and failed to recognize him, tillTelemachus began to reproach her and said:

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1.  As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."
2.  And Minerva answered, "I will tell you truly and particularly allabout it. I am Mentes, son of Anchialus, and I am King of theTaphians. I have come here with my ship and crew, on a voyage to menof a foreign tongue being bound for Temesa with a cargo of iron, and Ishall bring back copper. As for my ship, it lies over yonder off theopen country away from the town, in the harbour Rheithron under thewooded mountain Neritum. Our fathers were friends before us, as oldLaertes will tell you, if you will go and ask him. They say,however, that he never comes to town now, and lives by himself inthe country, faring hardly, with an old woman to look after him andget his dinner for him, when he comes in tired from pottering abouthis vineyard. They told me your father was at home again, and that waswhy I came, but it seems the gods are still keeping him back, for heis not dead yet not on the mainland. It is more likely he is on somesea-girt island in mid ocean, or a prisoner among savages who aredetaining him against his will I am no prophet, and know very littleabout omens, but I speak as it is borne in upon me from heaven, andassure you that he will not be away much longer; for he is a man ofsuch resource that even though he were in chains of iron he would findsome means of getting home again. But tell me, and tell me true, canUlysses really have such a fine looking fellow for a son? You areindeed wonderfully like him about the head and eyes, for we were closefriends before he set sail for Troy where the flower of all theArgives went also. Since that time we have never either of us seen theother."
3.  "Alas," he cried to himself in his dismay, "what ever will become ofme, and how is it all to end? If I stay here upon the river bedthrough the long watches of the night, I am so exhausted that thebitter cold and damp may make an end of me- for towards sunrisethere will be a keen wind blowing from off the river. If, on the otherhand, I climb the hill side, find shelter in the woods, and sleep insome thicket, I may escape the cold and have a good night's rest,but some savage beast may take advantage of me and devour me."
4.  "Hear me," said he, "aldermen and town councillors of thePhaeacians, that I may speak even as I am minded. This stranger,whoever he may be, has found his way to my house from somewhere orother either East or West. He wants an escort and wishes to have thematter settled. Let us then get one ready for him, as we have done forothers before him; indeed, no one who ever yet came to my house hasbeen able to complain of me for not speeding on his way soon enough.Let us draw a ship into the sea- one that has never yet made a voyage-and man her with two and fifty of our smartest young sailors. Thenwhen you have made fast your oars each by his own seat, leave the shipand come to my house to prepare a feast. I will find you ineverything. I am giving will these instructions to the young men whowill form the crew, for as regards you aldermen and towncouncillors, you will join me in entertaining our guest in thecloisters. I can take no excuses, and we will have Demodocus to singto us; for there is no bard like him whatever he may choose to singabout."
5.   Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.
6.  Ulysses answered, "Madam, I have foresworn rugs and blankets fromthe day that I left the snowy ranges of Crete to go on shipboard. Iwill lie as I have lain on many a sleepless night hitherto. Nightafter night have I passed in any rough sleeping place, and waitedfor morning. Nor, again, do I like having my feet washed; I shallnot let any of the young hussies about your house touch my feet;but, if you have any old and respectable woman who has gone through asmuch trouble as I have, I will allow her to wash them."

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1.  Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.
2.  They therefore aimed straight in front of them and threw theirspears. Ulysses killed Demoptolemus, Telemachus Euryades, EumaeusElatus, while the stockman killed Pisander. These all bit the dust,and as the others drew back into a corner Ulysses and his men rushedforward and regained their spears by drawing them from the bodies ofthe dead.
3.  Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland,answered, "Sister, why have you come here? You do not come very often,but I suppose that is because you live such a long way off. Am I,then, to leave off crying and refrain from all the sad thoughts thattorture me? I, who have lost my brave and lion-hearted husband, whohad every good quality under heaven, and whose name was great over allHellas and middle Argos; and now my darling son has gone off onboard of a ship- a foolish fellow who has never been used toroughing it, nor to going about among gatherings of men. I am evenmore anxious about him than about my husband; I am all in a tremblewhen I think of him, lest something should happen to him, eitherfrom the people among whom he has gone, or by sea, for he has manyenemies who are plotting against him, and are bent on killing himbefore he can return home."
4、  "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."
5、  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.

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  • 刘松恺 08-12

      With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:

  • 胡公满 08-12

      "On this I took comfort in spite of all my sorrow, and said, 'Iknow, then, about these two; tell me, therefore, about the third manof whom you spoke; is he still alive, but at sea, and unable to gethome? or is he dead? Tell me, no matter how much it may grieve me.'

  • 何异 08-12

       "Happy son of Peleus," answered the ghost of Agamemnon, "forhaving died at Troy far from Argos, while the bravest of the Trojansand the Achaeans fell round you fighting for your body. There youlay in the whirling clouds of dust, all huge and hugely, heedlessnow of your chivalry. We fought the whole of the livelong day, norshould we ever have left off if Jove had not sent a hurricane tostay us. Then, when we had borne you to the ships out of the fray,we laid you on your bed and cleansed your fair skin with warm waterand with ointments. The Danaans tore their hair and wept bitterlyround about you. Your mother, when she heard, came with her immortalnymphs from out of the sea, and the sound of a great wailing wentforth over the waters so that the Achaeans quaked for fear. They wouldhave fled panic-stricken to their ships had not wise old Nestorwhose counsel was ever truest checked them saying, 'Hold, Argives, flynot sons of the Achaeans, this is his mother coming from the seawith her immortal nymphs to view the body of her son.'

  • 陈旻 08-12

      "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."

  • 李晓军 08-11

    {  As he spoke he picked up a heifer's foot from the meat-basket inwhich it lay, and threw it at Ulysses, but Ulysses turned his head alittle aside, and avoided it, smiling grimly Sardinian fashion as hedid so, and it hit the wall, not him. On this Telemachus spokefiercely to Ctesippus, "It is a good thing for you," said he, "thatthe stranger turned his head so that you missed him. If you had hithim I should have run you through with my spear, and your father wouldhave had to see about getting you buried rather than married in thishouse. So let me have no more unseemly behaviour from any of you,for I am grown up now to the knowledge of good and evil and understandwhat is going on, instead of being the child that I have beenheretofore. I have long seen you killing my sheep and making free withmy corn and wine: I have put up with this, for one man is no match formany, but do me no further violence. Still, if you wish to kill me,kill me; I would far rather die than see such disgraceful scenes dayafter day- guests insulted, and men dragging the women servantsabout the house in an unseemly way."

  • 孟获 08-10

      "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."}

  • 彭雨琪 08-10

      Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."

  • 稗田阿礼 08-10

      Calypso trembled with rage when she heard this, "You gods," sheexclaimed, to be ashamed of yourselves. You are always jealous andhate seeing a goddess take a fancy to a mortal man, and live withhim in open matrimony. So when rosy-fingered Dawn made love toOrion, you precious gods were all of you furious till Diana went andkilled him in Ortygia. So again when Ceres fell in love with Iasion,and yielded to him in a thrice ploughed fallow field, Jove came tohear of it before so long and killed Iasion with his thunder-bolts.And now you are angry with me too because I have a man here. I foundthe poor creature sitting all alone astride of a keel, for Jove hadstruck his ship with lightning and sunk it in mid ocean, so that allhis crew were drowned, while he himself was driven by wind and waveson to my island. I got fond of him and cherished him, and had set myheart on making him immortal, so that he should never grow old all hisdays; still I cannot cross Jove, nor bring his counsels to nothing;therefore, if he insists upon it, let the man go beyond the seasagain; but I cannot send him anywhere myself for I have neitherships nor men who can take him. Nevertheless I will readily give himsuch advice, in all good faith, as will be likely to bring himsafely to his own country."

  • 雷琼道 08-09

       "'You know that yourself, old man,' I answered, 'you will gainnothing by trying to put me off. It is because I have been kept solong in this island, and see no sign of my being able to get away. Iam losing all heart; tell me, then, for you gods know everything,which of the immortals it is that is hindering me, and tell me alsohow I may sail the sea so as to reach my home?'

  • 金顺 08-07

    {  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."

  • 杜志刚 08-07

      "I see, sir," said Ulysses, "that you are an excellent gardener-what pains you take with it, to be sure. There is not a singleplant, not a fig tree, vine, olive, pear, nor flower bed, but bearsthe trace of your attention. I trust, however, that you will not beoffended if I say that you take better care of your garden than ofyourself. You are old, unsavoury, and very meanly clad. It cannot bebecause you are idle that your master takes such poor care of you,indeed your face and figure have nothing of the slave about them,and proclaim you of noble birth. I should have said that you wereone of those who should wash well, eat well, and lie soft at nightas old men have a right to do; but tell me, and tell me true, whosebondman are you, and in whose garden are you working? Tell me alsoabout another matter. Is this place that I have come to really Ithaca?I met a man just now who said so, but he was a dull fellow, and hadnot the patience to hear my story out when I was asking him about anold friend of mine, whether he was still living, or was already deadand in the house of Hades. Believe me when I tell you that this mancame to my house once when I was in my own country and never yet didany stranger come to me whom I liked better. He said that his familycame from Ithaca and that his father was Laertes, son of Arceisius.I received him hospitably, making him welcome to all the abundanceof my house, and when he went away I gave him all customarypresents. I gave him seven talents of fine gold, and a cup of solidsilver with flowers chased upon it. I gave him twelve light cloaks,and as many pieces of tapestry; I also gave him twelve cloaks ofsingle fold, twelve rugs, twelve fair mantles, and an equal numberof shirts. To all this I added four good looking women skilled inall useful arts, and I let him take his choice."

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