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2020-08-12 21:29:06  Դձ
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׷ijҳַ:a g 9 559 v i p<"'And I will tell you of all the wicked witchcraft that Circe willtry to practise upon you. She will mix a mess for you to drink, andshe will drug the meal with which she makes it, but she will not beable to charm you, for the virtue of the herb that I shall give youwill prevent her spells from working. I will tell you all about it.When Circe strikes you with her wand, draw your sword and springupon her as though you were goings to kill her. She will then befrightened and will desire you to go to bed with her; on this you mustnot point blank refuse her, for you want her to set your companionsfree, and to take good care also of yourself, but you make her swearsolemnly by all the blessed that she will plot no further mischiefagainst you, or else when she has got you naked she will unman you andmake you fit for nothing.'"Then I saw Minos son of Jove with his golden sceptre in his handsitting in judgement on the dead, and the ghosts were gathered sittingand standing round him in the spacious house of Hades, to learn hissentences upon them.

"'Then,' said they, 'if no man is attacking you, you must be ill;when Jove makes people ill, there is no help for it, and you hadbetter pray to your father Neptune.'

׷ijҳ廭

And Minerva said, "There is no fear of your race dying out yet,while Penelope has such a fine son as you are. But tell me, and tellme true, what is the meaning of all this feasting, and who are thesepeople? What is it all about? Have you some banquet, or is there awedding in the family- for no one seems to be bringing anyprovisions of his own? And the guests- how atrociously they arebehaving; what riot they make over the whole house; it is enough todisgust any respectable person who comes near them."

"She at once called her husband Antiphates from the place ofassembly, and forthwith he set about killing my men. He snatched upone of them, and began to make his dinner off him then and there,whereon the other two ran back to the ships as fast as ever theycould. But Antiphates raised a hue and cry after them, and thousandsof sturdy Laestrygonians sprang up from every quarter- ogres, not men.They threw vast rocks at us from the cliffs as though they had beenmere stones, and I heard the horrid sound of the ships crunching upagainst one another, and the death cries of my men, as theLaestrygonians speared them like fishes and took them home to eatthem. While they were thus killing my men within the harbour I drew mysword, cut the cable of my own ship, and told my men to row with alftheir might if they too would not fare like the rest; so they laid outfor their lives, and we were thankful enough when we got into openwater out of reach of the rocks they hurled at us. As for the othersthere was not one of them left.

Ulysses answered, "Laodamas, why do you taunt me in this way? mymind is set rather on cares than contests; I have been throughinfinite trouble, and am come among you now as a suppliant, prayingyour king and people to further me on my return home."

׷ijҳ ɻ

"Nestor," said he, "son of Neleus, honour to the Achaean name, youask whence we come, and I will tell you. We come from Ithaca underNeritum, and the matter about which I would speak is of private notpublic import. I seek news of my unhappy father Ulysses, who is saidto have sacked the town of Troy in company with yourself. We know whatfate befell each one of the other heroes who fought at Troy, but asregards Ulysses heaven has hidden from us the knowledge even that heis dead at all, for no one can certify us in what place he perished,nor say whether he fell in battle on the mainland, or was lost atsea amid the waves of Amphitrite. Therefore I am suppliant at yourknees, if haply you may be pleased to tell me of his melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller, for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for me, but tell me in all plainness exactly whatyou saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal service, eitherby word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed among the Trojans,bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."

Ulysses answered, "I hope you may be as dear to the gods as youare to me, for having saved me from going about and getting intotrouble; there is nothing worse than being always ways on the tramp;still, when men have once got low down in the world they will gothrough a great deal on behalf of their miserable bellies. Sincehowever you press me to stay here and await the return ofTelemachus, tell about Ulysses' mother, and his father whom he left onthe threshold of old age when he set out for Troy. Are they stillliving or are they already dead and in the house of Hades?"

׷ijҳйҶ ۻ

And Jove answered, "My child, why should you ask me? Was it not byyour own arrangement that Ulysses came home and took his revengeupon the suitors? Do whatever you like, but I will tell you what Ithink will be most reasonable arrangement. Now that Ulysses isrevenged, let them swear to a solemn covenant, in virtue of which heshall continue to rule, while we cause the others to forgive andforget the massacre of their sons and brothers. Let them then allbecome friends as heretofore, and let peace and plenty reign."

Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Melanthius was again going tothe store room to fetch more armour, but the swineherd saw him andsaid to Ulysses who was beside him, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, itis that scoundrel Melanthius, just as we suspected, who is going tothe store room. Say, shall I kill him, if I can get the better of him,or shall I bring him here that you may take your own revenge for allthe many wrongs that he has done in your house?"

Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:

׷ijҳͻ

Then Euryalus reviled him outright and said, "I gather, then, thatyou are unskilled in any of the many sports that men generally delightin. I suppose you are one of those grasping traders that go about inships as captains or merchants, and who think of nothing but oftheir outward freights and homeward cargoes. There does not seem to bemuch of the athlete about you."

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