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11ѡ5һţ:΢Ƶحվڷ籩֮

2020-08-12 01:16:41  Դձ
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When the Pilgrim had finished his speeches, the Gentlewoman whohad listned to them very attentively (because all the edged reasonsappeared to be plainly true) became verily perswaded, that all theseafictions had falne on her and her father, for the ingratefull offenceby her committed, and therefore thus is replied. Worthy man, and thefriend to goodnesse, I know undoubtedly, that the words which you havespoken are true, and also I understand by your demonstration, whatmanner of people some of those religious persons are, whomheretofore I have reputed to be Saints, but find them now to be farotherwise. And to speake truly, I perceive the fault to be great andgreevous, wherein I have offended against Theobaldo, and would (if Icould) willingly make amends, even in such manner as you have advised.But how is it possible to be done? Theobaldo being dead, can be [no]more recalled to this life; and therefore, I know not what promise Ishould make, in a matter which is not to bee performed. Whereto thePilgrime without any longer pausing, thus answered.

11ѡ5һţ廭

But returning where I left (being led out of my way by a just andreligious anger against such deformity) this Gentleman, MasterGuillaume Boursier, was willingly seene, and gladly welcommed by allthe best men in Geneway. Having remained some few daies in the City,and amongst other matters, heard much talke of the miserablecovetousnesse of master Herminio, he grew very desirous to have asight of him. Master Herminio had already understood, that thisGentleman, Master Guillaume Boursier was vertuously disposed, and (howcovetously soever hee was inclined) having in him some sparkes ofnoble nature, gave him very good words, and gracious entertainment,discoursing with him on divers occasions.

Away shee went in all haste with the Sisters, who were so forward inthe detection of poore Isabella, as they never regarded what manner ofvaile the Lady Abbesse wore on her head. And being come to theDorter doore, quickly they lifted it off from the hookes, and beingentred, found the two Lovers sweetly imbracing: but yet so amazed atthis sudden surprisall, as they durst not stirre, nor speake one word.The young Nunne Isabella, was raised forthwith by the other Sisters,and according as the Abbesse had comanded, was brought by them intothe Chapter-house: the yong Gentleman remaining still in theChamber, where he put on his garments, awaiting to see the issue ofthis businesse, and verily intending to act severe revenge on hisbetrayers, if any harme were done to Isabella, and afterward to takeher thence away with him, as meaning to make her amends by marriage.

Can it be possible (quoth Helena) that you should be so benummedwith colde? Then I plainely perceive, that men can lye in their loveletters, which I can shew under your own hand, how you fryed inflames, and all for my love, and so have you written to me in everyletter. Poore credulous women are often thus deluded, in beleevingwhat men write and speake out of passion: but I will returne backeto my Brother, and make no doubt of dispatch, because I would gladlyhave your Company.

11ѡ5һţ ɻ

It is not any long time since, when there lived in our City ofFlorence, a young and beautifull Damosell, yet according to the natureof her condition; because she was the Daughter of a poore Father,and called by the name of Simonida. Now, albeit she was not suppliedby any better means, then to maintaine her selfe by her ownepainfull travell, and earne her bread before she could eate it, bycarding and spinning to such as employed her; yet was she not sobase or dejected a spirit, but had both courage and sufficient vertue,to understand the secret soliciting of love, and to distinguish theparts of well deserving both by private behaviour and outwardceremony. As naturall instinct was her first tutor thereto, sowanted she not a second maine and urging motion, a chip hewed out ofthe like Timber, one no better in birth then her selfe, a proper youngspringall, named Pasquino, whose generous behaviour, and gracefullactions (in bringing her dayly wooll to spin, by reason his Master wasa Clothier) prevailed upon her liking and affection.

Violenta, who had concealed her amisse so long as she could, and sawno other remedy, but now at last it must needes be discovered; wentprivately to her Mother, and (in teares) revealed her infirmity,humbly craving her pardon, and furtherance in hiding it from herFather. The Mother being extraordinarily displeased, chiding herwith many sharpe and angry speeches, would needes know with whomshee had thus offended. The Daughter (to keepe Pedro from anydetection) forged a Tale of her owne braine, farre from any truthindeede, which her Mother verily beleeving, and willing to preserveher Daughter from shame, as also the fierce anger of her Husband, hebeing a man of very implacable nature: conveyed her to the CountreyFarme, whither Signior Amarigo sildome or never resorted, intending(under the shadow of sicknesse) to let her lye in there, without theleast suspition of any in Trapani.

11ѡ5һţйҶ ۻ

THE INDUCTION TO THE NINTH DAY

Hereupon, the Gardiner was presently sent for, and before theJudge would depart thence, he saw the bed of Sage digged up by theroots, and found the true occasion, whereby these two poore Loverslost their lives. For, just in the middest of the bed, and at themaine roote, which directed all the Sage in growth; lay an huge mightyToad, even weltring (as it were) in a hole full of poyson; by meaneswhereof, in conjecture of the judge, and all the rest, the whole bedof Sage became envenomed, occasioning every leafe thereof to be deadlyin taste. None being so hardy, as to approach neere the Toade, theymade a pile of wood directly over it, and setting it on a flamingfire, threw all the Sage thereinto, and so they were consumedtogether. So ended all further suite in Law, concerning the deathsof Pasquino and Simonida: whose bodies being carried to the Churchof Saint Paul, by their sad and sorrowfull accusers, Strambo,Lagina, Atticciato and Malagevole, were buried together in onegoodly Monument, for a future memory of their hard Fortune.

This vertuous Lady, being wearied with his often temptations, andseeing, that by denying whatsoever he demanded, yet he wold not giveover his suite, but so much the more importunatly stil pursued her:began to bethinke her selfe, how she might best be rid of him, byimposing some such taske upon him, as should bee impossible (in heropinion) for him to effect. An olde woman, whom hee imployed for hiscontinual messenger to her, as shee came one day about her ordinaryerrand, with her she communed in this manner. Good woman (quoth she)thou hast so often assured me, that Signior Ansaldo loveth me aboveall other Women in the world, offering me wonderfull gifts andpresents in his name, which I have alwayes refused, and so stil wildo, in regard I am not to be woon by any such allurements: yet if Icould be soundly perswaded, that his affection is answerable to thyperemptory protestations, I shoulde (perhaps) be the sooner wonne,to listen to his suite in milder manner, then hitherto I have done.Wherefore, if he wil give me assurance, to perform such a businesse asI mean to enjoyne him, he shall the speedier heare better answerfrom me, and I wil confirme it with mine oath.

11ѡ5һţͻ

Gracious company, there is no defect in this Banquet, or more debarsit of the honour it might else have, but onely the presence ofTheobaldo, who having bin continually in your company, it seemes youare not willing to take knowledge of him, and therefore I meane myselfe to shew him. So, uncasing himselfe out of his Pilgrimes clothes,and standing in his Hose and Doublet, to their no little admiration,they all knew him, yet doubted whether it were he, or no. Which heperceiving, he repeated his brethrens and absent kindreds names, andwhat occurrences hapned betweene them from time to time, beside therelation of his owne passed fortunes, inciting teares in the eyes ofhis brethren, and all else there present, every one hugging andembracing him, yea, many beside, who were no kin at all to him.Hermelina onely excepted: which when Aldobrandino saw, he said untoher; How now Hermelina? Why doest thou not welcome home Theobaldo,so kindly as the rest have done?

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11ѡ5һţ-Ĭ˹Ӱ£йҵη So much delight my beauty yeelds to mee, ϸ

С10пֵɳ⻹800Ԫ人| ̵2018|人ҽԺҽ¹ڷײ

11ѡ5һţӲˣ56ϰָվۻ׼ˣѣⲨ Striguario made no delaying of the matter, but got himselfe closelieunder the Fat, and Peronella opening the doore for her husbandsenterance, with a frowning countenance, spake thus unto him. Whatmeaneth this so early returning home againe this morning? Itseemeth, thou intendest to do nothing to day, having brought backe thytooles in thy hands? If such be thine intent, how shall we live? Whereshal we have bread to fill our bellies? Dooest thou thinke, that Iwill suffer thee to pawne my gowne, and other poore garments, asheeretofore thou hast done? I that card and spinne both night and day,till I have worne the flesh from my fingers; yet all will hardly findeoyle to maintaine our Lampe. Husband, husband, there is not oneneighbour dwelling by us, but makes a mockerie of me, and tels meplainly, that I may be ashamed to drudge and moyle as I do;wondering not a little, how I am able to endure it; and thou returnesthome with thy hands in thy hose, as if thou hadst no worke at all todo this day. ϸ

11ѡ5һţ̩иƲ| ̵2018|ʡ¹ڷ2447 ۼ22112
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