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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:程某伟 大小:4ScJH31b70797KB 下载:Nm3H3vpN26235次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:9Pt7eGoU81936条
日期:2020-08-07 23:19:16
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里兹·凯利

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The suitors were surprised and angry at what had happened, so theywent outside the great wall that ran round the outer court, and held acouncil near the main entrance. Eurymachus, son of Polybus, was thefirst to speak.
2.  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."
3.  As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.
4.  On this he aimed a deadly arrow at Antinous, who was about to takeup a two-handled gold cup to drink his wine and already had it inhis hands. He had no thought of death- who amongst all the revellerswould think that one man, however brave, would stand alone among somany and kill him? The arrow struck Antinous in the throat, and thepoint went clean through his neck, so that he fell over and the cupdropped from his hand, while a thick stream of blood gushed from hisnostrils. He kicked the table from him and upset the things on it,so that the bread and roasted meats were all soiled as they fellover on to the ground. The suitors were in an uproar when they sawthat a man had been hit; they sprang in dismay one and all of themfrom their seats and looked everywhere towards the walls, but therewas neither shield nor spear, and they rebuked Ulysses very angrily."Stranger," said they, "you shall pay for shooting people in this way:om yi you shall see no other contest; you are a doomed man; he whomyou have slain was the foremost youth in Ithaca, and the vulturesshall devour you for having killed him."
5.  "You shall go to bed as soon as you please," replied Penelope,"now that the gods have sent you home to your own good house and toyour country. But as heaven has put it in your mind to speak of it,tell me about the task that lies before you. I shall have to hearabout it later, so it is better that I should be told at once."
6.  On this Helen told the maid servants to set beds in the room thatwas in the gatehouse, and to make them with good red rugs, andspread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks for the gueststo wear. So the maids went out, carrying a torch, and made the beds,to which a man-servant presently conducted the strangers. Thus,then, did Telemachus and Pisistratus sleep there in the forecourt,while the son of Atreus lay in an inner room with lovely Helen byhis side.

计划指导

1.  "Pray do not scold her," replied Ulysses; "she is not to blame.She did tell me to follow along with the maids, but I was ashamedand afraid, for I thought you might perhaps be displeased if you sawme. Every human being is sometimes a little suspicious and irritable."
2.  A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewerand poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, andshe drew a clean table beside them. An upper servant brought thembread, and offered them many good things of what there was in thehouse, the carver fetched them plates of all manner of meats and setcups of gold by their side, and a man-servant brought them wine andpoured it out for them.
3.  "I wish it may prove so," answered Telemachus. "If it does, I willshow you so much good will and give you so many presents that allwho meet you will congratulate you."
4.  "More's the pity," answered Telemachus, "I am sorry for him, butwe must leave him to himself just now. If people could have everythingtheir own way, the first thing I should choose would be the returnof my father; but go, and give your message; then make haste backagain, and do not turn out of your way to tell Laertes. Tell my motherto send one of her women secretly with the news at once, and let himhear it from her."
5.  "My good nurse," answered Penelope, "you must be mad. The godssometimes send some very sensible people out of their minds, andmake foolish people become sensible. This is what they must havebeen doing to you; for you always used to be a reasonable person.Why should you thus mock me when I have trouble enough already-talking such nonsense, and waking me up out of a sweet sleep thathad taken possession of my eyes and closed them? I have never slept sosoundly from the day my poor husband went to that city with theill-omened name. Go back again into the women's room; if it had beenany one else, who had woke me up to bring me such absurd news I shouldhave sent her away with a severe scolding. As it is, your age shallprotect you."
6.  "Eumaeus, and all of you, to-morrow I want to go away and beginbegging about the town, so as to be no more trouble to you or toyour men. Give me your advice therefore, and let me have a goodguide to go with me and show me the way. I will go the round of thecity begging as I needs must, to see if any one will give me a drinkand a piece of bread. I should like also to go to the house of Ulyssesand bring news of her husband to queen Penelope. I could then go aboutamong the suitors and see if out of all their abundance they will giveme a dinner. I should soon make them an excellent servant in all sortsof ways. Listen and believe when I tell you that by the blessing ofMercury who gives grace and good name to the works of all men, thereis no one living who would make a more handy servant than I should- toput fresh wood on the fire, chop fuel, carve, cook, pour out wine, anddo all those services that poor men have to do for their betters."

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1.  And Penelope said, "If the gods are going to vouchsafe you a happiertime in your old age, you may hope then to have some respite frommisfortune."
2.  As he spoke he reeled, and fell sprawling face upwards on theground. His great neck hung heavily backwards and a deep sleep tookhold upon him. Presently he turned sick, and threw up both wine andthe gobbets of human flesh on which he had been gorging, for he wasvery drunk. Then I thrust the beam of wood far into the embers to heatit, and encouraged my men lest any of them should turnfaint-hearted. When the wood, green though it was, was about to blaze,I drew it out of the fire glowing with heat, and my men gathered roundme, for heaven had filled their hearts with courage. We drove thesharp end of the beam into the monster's eye, and bearing upon it withall my weight I kept turning it round and round as though I wereboring a hole in a ship's plank with an auger, which two men with awheel and strap can keep on turning as long as they choose. Eventhus did we bore the red hot beam into his eye, till the boiling bloodbubbled all over it as we worked it round and round, so that the steamfrom the burning eyeball scalded his eyelids and eyebrows, and theroots of the eye sputtered in the fire. As a blacksmith plunges an axeor hatchet into cold water to temper it- for it is this that givesstrength to the iron- and it makes a great hiss as he does so, eventhus did the Cyclops' eye hiss round the beam of olive wood, and hishideous yells made the cave ring again. We ran away in a fright, buthe plucked the beam all besmirched with gore from his eye, andhurled it from him in a frenzy of rage and pain, shouting as he did soto the other Cyclopes who lived on the bleak headlands near him; sothey gathered from all quarters round his cave when they heard himcrying, and asked what was the matter with him.
3.  As he was speaking a bird flew by upon his right hand- a hawk,Apollo's messenger. It held a dove in its talons, and the feathers, asit tore them off, fell to the ground midway between Telemachus and theship. On this Theoclymenus called him apart and caught him by thehand. "Telemachus," said he, "that bird did not fly on your right handwithout having been sent there by some god. As soon as I saw it I knewit was an omen; it means that you will remain powerful and thatthere will be no house in Ithaca more royal than your own."
4.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
5.   "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:
6.  "Then he dived under the sea, and she in due course bore Peliasand Neleus, who both of them served Jove with all their might.Pelias was a great breeder of sheep and lived in Iolcus, but the otherlived in Pylos. The rest of her children were by Cretheus, namely,Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon, who was a mighty warrior and charioteer.

应用

1.  As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."
2.  "I will not refuse you," replied Telemachus, "if you wish to joinus. Come, therefore, and in Ithaca we will treat you hospitablyaccording to what we have."
3.  "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."
4、  Then Melanthius the goatherd answered, "You ill-conditioned cur,what are you talking about? Some day or other I will put you onboard ship and take you to a foreign country, where I can sell you andpocket the money you will fetch. I wish I were as sure that Apollowould strike Telemachus dead this very day, or that the suitorswould kill him, as I am that Ulysses will never come home again."
5、  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'

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  • 宛鑫 08-06

      He found her at home. There was a large fire burning on thehearth, and one could smell from far the fragrant reek of burningcedar and sandal wood. As for herself, she was busy at her loom,shooting her golden shuttle through the warp and singingbeautifully. Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar,and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds hadbuilt their nests- owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupytheir business in the waters. A vine loaded with grapes was trainedand grew luxuriantly about the mouth of the cave; there were also fourrunning rills of water in channels cut pretty close together, andturned hither and thither so as to irrigate the beds of violets andluscious herbage over which they flowed. Even a god could not helpbeing charmed with such a lovely spot, so Mercury stood still andlooked at it; but when he had admired it sufficiently he went insidethe cave.

  • 塞米蒂 08-06

      While he was thus in two minds, Neptune sent a terrible great wavethat seemed to rear itself above his head till it broke right over theraft, which then went to pieces as though it were a heap of drychaff tossed about by a whirlwind. Ulysses got astride of one plankand rode upon it as if he were on horseback; he then took off theclothes Calypso had given him, bound Ino's veil under his arms, andplunged into the sea- meaning to swim on shore. King Neptune watchedhim as he did so, and wagged his head, muttering to himself andsaying, "'There now, swim up and down as you best can till you fall inwith well-to-do people. I do not think you will be able to say thatI have let you off too lightly." On this he lashed his horses anddrove to Aegae where his palace is.

  • 休伊特 08-06

       "Is that so?" exclaimed Minerva, "then you do indeed want Ulysseshome again. Give him his helmet, shield, and a couple lances, and ifhe is the man he was when I first knew him in our house, drinkingand making merry, he would soon lay his hands about these rascallysuitors, were he to stand once more upon his own threshold. He wasthen coming from Ephyra, where he had been to beg poison for hisarrows from Ilus, son of Mermerus. Ilus feared the ever-living godsand would not give him any, but my father let him have some, for hewas very fond of him. If Ulysses is the man he then was thesesuitors will have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.

  • 约翰·李 08-06

      "Next to her I saw Antiope, daughter to Asopus, who could boast ofhaving slept in the arms of even Jove himself, and who bore him twosons Amphion and Zethus. These founded Thebes with its seven gates,and built a wall all round it; for strong though they were theycould not hold Thebes till they had walled it.

  • 塞申斯 08-05

    {  He had hardly done speaking when Amphinomus turned in his placeand saw the ship inside the harbour, with the crew lowering her sails,and putting by their oars; so he laughed, and said to the others,"We need not send them any message, for they are here. Some god musthave told them, or else they saw the ship go by, and could notovertake her.

  • 卡塔妮娜 08-04

      So saying she lashed the mules with her whip and they left theriver. The mules drew well and their hoofs went up and down upon theroad. She was careful not to go too fast for Ulysses and the maids whowere following on foot along with the waggon, so she plied her whipwith judgement. As the sun was going down they came to the sacredgrove of Minerva, and there Ulysses sat down and prayed to themighty daughter of Jove.}

  • 尚原野 08-04

      "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."

  • 陈锦鸿 08-04

      Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."

  • 周然 08-03

       NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."

  • 曹甲伟 08-01

    {  A servant presently led in the famous bard Demodocus, whom themuse had dearly loved, but to whom she had given both good and evil,for though she had endowed him with a divine gift of song, she hadrobbed him of his eyesight. Pontonous set a seat for him among theguests, leaning it up against a bearing-post. He hung the lyre for himon a peg over his head, and showed him where he was to feel for itwith his hands. He also set a fair table with a basket of victualsby his side, and a cup of wine from which he might drink whenever hewas so disposed.

  • 莎拉-吉布森 08-01

      She was nothing loth, so they went to the couch to take theirrest, whereon they were caught in the toils which cunning Vulcan hadspread for them, and could neither get up nor stir hand or foot, butfound too late that they were in a trap. Then Vulcan came up tothem, for he had turned back before reaching Lemnos, when his scoutthe sun told him what was going on. He was in a furious passion, andstood in the vestibule making a dreadful noise as he shouted to allthe gods.

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